Media Coverage

The work done by Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine faculty members (and even some students) is regularly highlighted in newspapers, online media outlets and more. Below you’ll find links to articles and videos of Feinberg in the news.

PBS 0

So far, scientists can take a piece of ovarian tissue, freeze it and then re-implant it into a patient to produce mature eggs. That process has resulted in at least 100 births so far, mostly by adult patients who were treated for cancer, said Dr. Teresa Woodruff, a reproductive endocrinologist researching the issue at Northwestern’s Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago. Yet this process does not work for all patients, and researchers say that it is unlikely to work for trans people who transition with hormone therapy. So they started to look for ways to grow that tissue in a petri dish, so it can develop into a mature egg. In November, Woodruff co-authored a study in the journal Nature that did just that. “We can continue to develop that technology and eventually, hopefully, this will transfer to all the individuals who are looking for fertility intervention,” Woodruff said.

U.S. News & World Report 0

Despite being a major health threat, obesity isn’t widely discussed in U.S. medical schools, a new study suggests. Obesity is barely mentioned in U.S. medical students’ licensing exams, according to the researchers at Northwestern University School of Medicine in Chicago.

HealthDay 0

Despite being a major health threat, obesity isn’t widely discussed in U.S. medical schools, a new study suggests. Obesity is barely mentioned in U.S. medical students’ licensing exams, according to the researchers at Northwestern University School of Medicine in Chicago.

TIME Magazine 0

Finally, it’s possible that one of the ingredients in your balm could cause an allergic reaction, says Dr. Roopal Kundu, an associate professor of dermatology at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine. But this is true of pretty much anything you put on or in your body. “Everyone’s allergic to something,” Friedman says. “Considering how many people use lip balm, it’s not surprising that some people would experience a reaction.”

CBS Chicago 0

Dr. Edward Schaeffer, chair of the department of urology at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine, said the study allows doctors to catch problems much earlier than in the past. “By doing that, you may be able to help patients be more proactive about their follow-up, and their subsequent treatment after radiation therapy,” he said.

Chicago Tribune 0

In recent years, doctors and patients increasingly have turned to a new type of cancer treatment that uses the body’s own immune system to battle the disease. Now, Northwestern Medicine is taking that fight up a notch, co-leading a national trial to test an immunotherapy drug combination on people with rare cancers. It will be the first federally funded immunotherapy trial devoted to rare cancers, according to SWOG, a cancer clinical trial group that is managing the trial.

Chicago Tribune 0

Teachers and school staff members usually know what to do when they have students with food allergies, but Ruchi Gupta is hoping that a series of videos will help educate students about them too. On Friday, she showed one of the videos to a group of fifth-graders at the Latin School of Chicago. In the video, a student talked about his own food allergies over lunch with his friends. “How many of you have food allergies?” asked Gupta, a pediatrician and the director of the Food Allergy Outcomes Research Program at Northwestern Medicine.

Yahoo! 0

Pills are a bandage, not a cure, says Dr. Phyllis Zee, professor of neurology and sleep medicine at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine. “It’s like taking Tylenol every day for a fever without ever figuring out what’s causing the fever,” Zee says. Depression, too little exercise, runaway stress and a hundred other major or minor health issues could be causing or contributing to your sleeping woes. When you attack your problem with pills, you do nothing to resolve those underlying problems, she explains.

TIME Magazine 0

Pills are a bandage, not a cure, says Dr. Phyllis Zee, professor of neurology and sleep medicine at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine. “It’s like taking Tylenol every day for a fever without ever figuring out what’s causing the fever,” Zee says. Depression, too little exercise, runaway stress and a hundred other major or minor health issues could be causing or contributing to your sleeping woes. When you attack your problem with pills, you do nothing to resolve those underlying problems, she explains.

Yahoo! 0

If stripping down and asking your significant other to examine every inch of your body sounds more anxiety-inducing than romantic, you’re not alone. Many women feel this way, say the authors of a new study on partner skin-cancer screenings. But the benefits of such a practice outweigh the embarrassment, their research suggests. And don’t worry, they say: The awkwardness fades over time.

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