Media Coverage

The work done by Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine faculty members (and even some students) is regularly highlighted in newspapers, online media outlets and more. Below you’ll find links to articles and videos of Feinberg in the news.

Crain's Chicago Business 0

A team at Northwestern Medicine is developing techniques that could one day create functional kidneys in their Streeterville lab, says Dr. Jason Wertheim, a transplant surgeon at Northwestern Memorial Hospital and vice chair for research in the department of surgery at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine. Funded partly by a $1.5 million grant from the National Institutes of Health, the researchers use chemicals to strip animals’ cells from their organs, leaving behind only scaffolds—”the structural building blocks of organs,” Wertheim said. It’s expensive work, which is why the team is currently using tiny rat kidneys that require fewer of the costly nutrients needed for cells to grow.

The New York Times 0

Dr. Namratha Kandula, a Masala investigator at Northwestern, said she hopes to study the children of the Masala participants next because they tend to influence their parents’ health and lifestyle habits, and the researchers want to understand whether health risks in second-generation South Asians are similar or not. But for now, some experts say their goal is to increase outreach to South Asians who may be at high risk and neglecting their health.

The New York Times 0

Even in some cases in which it doesn’t prevent depression, counseling may be beneficial, said Dr. Melissa Simon, a task force member and vice chairwoman of research at Northwestern’s Feinberg School of Medicine’s obstetrics and gynecology department. “It provides the pregnant person with education and coping strategies,” she said, and can help those who develop depression “get referred and embedded into treatment more effectively and efficiently.”

U.S. News & World Report 0

“With the stress cancer patients are under, they tend to be at higher risk of relapsing for a longer period of time. So we thought providing treatment for longer would be more effective,” said study senior author Brian Hitsman. He’s an associate professor of preventive medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, in Chicago. All of the study participants had concurrent behavioral therapy. Though this therapy wasn’t a focus of the research, Hitsman said that it needs to be studied more closely because it can be a powerful tool to help cancer patients quit smoking. “You can imagine how someone going through a severe or significant disease and treatment process could benefit from the support we provided in this study,” he said in a university news release.

Chicago Tribune 0

But he also questions if enough funding will be available, given the state’s constant fiscal woes. Brian Mustanski, director of the Institute for Sexual and Gender Minority Health and Wellbeing at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, said there’s a need for better understanding of how to provide treatment access to young, gay and bisexual men of color, who are disproportionately affected by HIV. In addition to targeting geographic hot spots, he said, prevention efforts also have to focus on “demographic hot spots.”

Chicago Tribune 0

“This isn’t just a women’s health issue,” says Nicole Woitowich, director of the Illinois Women’s Health Registry and associate director of the Women’s Health Research Institute at Northwestern University, “it’s an everybody’s health issue.”[…]“If we’re not going to be asked to participate in studies,” says Teresa Woodruff, director of Northwestern’s Women’s Health Research Institute, “we should just put our hand in the air. The Women’s Health Registry is a way for us to put our hand in the air.”

U.S. News & World Report 0

Brian Mustanski directs the Institute for Sexual and Minority Health and Wellbeing at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago. He agreed that the elimination of new cases of HIV infection by 2030 is possible — given certain conditions. “If we are going to end HIV transmissions in the U.S., we need research to help understand how to effectively deliver the right interventions to the right communities at the right time,” he said. “Every 44 minutes, a 13- to 29-year-old gay or bisexual man in the U.S. gets diagnosed with HIV,” Mustanski added. “These diagnoses are disproportionally among young men of color — the only group in the U.S. to show increases in the rate of annual diagnoses. Any plan to end HIV transmission in the U.S. must center on the needs of young gay and bisexual men of color in order to be successful.”

ABC News 0

“They found an association, but the chance that watching TV is causing the cancer is not likely. People who are more sedentary likely have other risk factors that weren’t accounted for,” said Dr. Rajesh Keswani, a gastroenterologist and medical director of quality for the Northwestern Medicine Digestive Health Center, who was not involved in the study. “This is a reminder to be more active throughout the day. For health care providers it really crystallizes how we should advise people on exercise.”

The Wall Street Journal 0

A study published in January in JAMA Network Open found that 10.8% of U.S. adults—more than 26 million—have a food allergy, and about half developed a new food allergy as an adult. “It was definitely more than I expected,” says Ruchi Gupta, a professor of pediatrics at Northwestern University and Lurie Children’s Hospital and first author of the study. The researchers say they can’t determine definitively if the number of adults with food allergies is increasing because it is the first comprehensive study on the topic and it is difficult to compare studies that use different methodologies. But anecdotally, doctors say they are seeing more adult patients with food allergies and it is important to know the scope of the problem to better understand and manage it.

U.S. News & World Report 0

WHETHER YOU’RE TRYING to lose weight, manage your blood sugar levels or reduce your risk of cardiovascular disease, you’ve probably heard the adage that focusing on whole or complex carbs and cutting down on refined ones can help you achieve your goals. “Carbohydrates often get a bad rap, but each type affects the body differently and many types and sources are beneficial to health,” explains Holly Herrington, a registered dietitian and certified diabetes educator at Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago. Knowing the differences between each type of carbohydrate is vital to making smarter, healthier decisions with your nutrition.

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