Media Coverage

The work done by Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine faculty members (and even some students) is regularly highlighted in newspapers, online media outlets and more. Below you’ll find links to articles and videos of Feinberg in the news.

U.S. News & World Report 0

Increasing exercise intensity can be as simple as adding a short sprint into a longer walk or run, said Mercedes Carnethon, vice chair of preventive medicine at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine. “High-intensity interval training provides variety and challenges that appeal to some types of personalities,” Carnethon said. “Some people enjoy the sedative experience of jogging or walking briskly for a period of time. Others want to do short bursts of activity.”

Associated Press 0

Studies have found that allowing parents to spend time with stillborn infants may reduce mothers’ chances for developing anxiety and depression afterward. Many U.S. hospitals let parents spend hours or even days with them. Some hospitals take memento photographs, footprints and handprints for families; some provide cooling cots to preserve the body while the family grieves. We stress “how important it is to the patient for us to get comfortable being with them and talking about it and reassuring them that this is a terrible thing but they will get through it,” said Dr. Alan Peaceman, who heads Northwestern Medicine’s maternal-fetal medicine department in Chicago.

U.S. News & World Report 0

THE NUMBER OF MEN developing metastatic prostate cancer is increasing rapidly, research published in 2016 in the journal Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases suggests. The number of new cases of metastatic, or stage 4, prostate cancer shot up 72 percent between 2004 and 2013, according to the Northwestern Medicine study. Overall, one in nine men in the U.S. will develop prostate cancer during his lifetime, according to the American Cancer Society. While the five-year survival rate for men with early-stage prostate cancer is nearly 100 percent, the numbers are far worse for those with a metastatic form of the disease. About two-thirds of men with metastatic prostate cancer succumb to it within five years of their diagnosis, says Dr. Sean Cavanaugh, the radiation oncology director of the CTCA Genitourinary Cancer Institute in Atlanta.

Chicago Tribune 0

Super agers tend to share a number of traits that we can all seek to emulate. They’re generally active and engaged, whether through work, volunteering or socializing, and they’re resilient in the face of setbacks. “These individuals didn’t necessarily have easy lives,” says Emily Rogalski, associate professor at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine. But they “tend to do a very good job of finding the silver lining.” Strong friendships may be key to protecting the brain in later life.

HealthDay 0

After adjusting for various factors, researchers discovered participants had a 34 percent increase in the likelihood of developing atherosclerosis with each 10 percent increase in nearby convenience stores. “This supports the notion that place matters,” said Kiarri Kershaw, the study’s senior author. “An increase in convenience stores may make unhealthy eating options more readily accessible. It may also be a marker for a larger set of changes occurring in a neighborhood that could influence health, like a decline in wealth or economic investment.”

The Washington Post 0

Why? When our environment is unkempt, anxiety can bleed into other parts of our lives, making us feel badly about ourselves. Researchers have known for years that being around clutter can raise stress levels, especially among women — who can find it difficult to manage and organize their family’s possessions. Inger Burnett-Zeigler, an assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine, said a disorganized environment is a constant visual reminder of things left undone. It can make people feel “like they’re overwhelmed, and their life is out of control and in chaos.” On the flip side, studies show that women who see their homes as restorative feel less depressed throughout the day. Having order and simplicity in your space can free up your mind.

Chicago Tribune 0

Why? When our environment is unkempt, anxiety can bleed into other parts of our lives, making us feel badly about ourselves. Researchers have known for years that being around clutter can raise stress levels, especially among women – who can find it difficult to manage and organize their family’s possessions. Inger Burnett-Zeigler, an assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine, said a disorganized environment is a constant visual reminder of things left undone. It can make people feel “like they’re overwhelmed, and their life is out of control and in chaos.”

Crain's Chicago Business 0

Lurie Children’s Hospital is opening a 20-bed ward for patients who are too sick for general inpatient care but don’t need an intensive-care unit. The intermediate-care unit is set to open Feb. 22 at the Streeterville hospital. It will have a staff of about 75, and the average length of stay for patients will be 36 to 72 hours, compared with 24 to 36 hours on Lurie’s general inpatient floors. Intermediate-care units, also called step-down and transitional-care units, have been around for decades, but hospitals use the model in a variety of ways.

Crain's Chicago Business 0

A team at Northwestern Medicine is developing techniques that could one day create functional kidneys in their Streeterville lab, says Dr. Jason Wertheim, a transplant surgeon at Northwestern Memorial Hospital and vice chair for research in the department of surgery at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine. Funded partly by a $1.5 million grant from the National Institutes of Health, the researchers use chemicals to strip animals’ cells from their organs, leaving behind only scaffolds—”the structural building blocks of organs,” Wertheim said. It’s expensive work, which is why the team is currently using tiny rat kidneys that require fewer of the costly nutrients needed for cells to grow.

The New York Times 0

Dr. Namratha Kandula, a Masala investigator at Northwestern, said she hopes to study the children of the Masala participants next because they tend to influence their parents’ health and lifestyle habits, and the researchers want to understand whether health risks in second-generation South Asians are similar or not. But for now, some experts say their goal is to increase outreach to South Asians who may be at high risk and neglecting their health.

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