Media Coverage

The work done by Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine faculty members (and even some students) is regularly highlighted in newspapers, online media outlets and more. Below you’ll find links to articles and videos of Feinberg in the news.

Reuters 0

The study’s use of video time to boost activity was intriguing to Linda Van Horn, a professor of preventive medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago and a Northwestern Medicine epidemiologist. The findings show that “harnessing modern technology along with appealing to a child’s interest in gaming can help achieve an increase in physical activity,” said Van Horn, who was not involved in the new research. “Everybody is more interested in reducing exposure to screens.

Reuters 0

The new study may actually be underestimating the effects of the media because it only looked at one week after the suicide, said Mark Reinecke, head of psychology at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago. “I think we’ve known for a long time that media can have an impact on suicide contagion,” said Reinecke who is not affiliated with the new study. “They’ve unpacked that and shown the specific types of information included in media can have an impact on outcomes. I think they are quite right.”

Chicago Tribune 0

Dr. Daniel Robinson, assistant professor of pediatrics at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, says the study “provides more supportive evidence that the early childhood frame, especially during infancy, is critical for brain development.” “I do think that this study contributes to this notion that how and what we provide to babies — the nutrition we provide them — in that early time frame has long-lasting implications,” said Robinson, who has an expertise in infant nutrition and breast milk feedings.

NBC News 0

One concern about the exercises was that they might actually create more wrinkles, frown lines and crow’s feet than they were getting rid of, says the study’s lead author Murad Alam, MD, Vice Chair and Chief of Cutaneous and Aesthetic Surgery in the Department of Dermatology at Northwestern Medicine’s Feinberg School of Medicine. “But this didn’t happen in any of the participants,” he tells NBC News BETTER.

Crain's Chicago Business 0

John Rogers, one of the world’s top researchers in materials science, joined Northwestern University from the University of Illinois in 2016. His specialty is tiny, flexible, wearable technology. He recently teamed up with Gatorade to produce a small, flexible skin patch that captures sweat and can tell users how much fluid and electrolytes they’re losing. He’s also partnered with L’Oreal on a tiny device worn on the fingernail that monitors UV exposure. Rogers, 50, lives in Wilmette with his wife and son.

Reuters 0

While the study doesn’t prove that consuming a Mediterranean diet will lessen the severity of psoriasis, “it raises some interesting questions and is provocative,” said Dr. Jonathan Silverberg, an associate professor of dermatology, preventive medicine and medical social sciences at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago and director of the Eczema Center at Northwestern Medicine. “Other studies have suggested a connection. So this would be confirmatory of those studies.”

The New York Times 0

Dr. Martha Twaddle cited the case of an Illinois woman in her 50s who was reaching end-stage heart failure. She had been barely reactive, but then sat up and asked for a hamburger famous in Skokie. “It’s some enormous hamburger, the size of your face with all this stuff on it. She took two bites and then fell back asleep,” said Dr. Twaddle, a physician associated with the Northwestern Medical Group in Lake Forest, Ill., who has worked in palliative care since 1989. She has had nonreactive patients jolt up to ask for a relative, or share final wishes before they die. “Sometimes they want to give instructions to the family, like, ‘Don’t forget to take care of the car.’ Something mundane but important to them.”

NBC News 0

“Reading, by engaging the brain, may keep the brain active enough to prevent cognitive decline that is associated with a variety of diseases associated with earlier mortality,” explains Avni Bavishi, an MD candidate at the Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University.

Reuters 0

Still, the results suggest that screening parents during children’s checkups may help spot symptoms of depression in fathers who otherwise might not get assessed or treated, said Dr. Craig Garfield, a pediatrics researcher at Northwestern University and Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago. “Children thrive when parents thrive,” Garfield, who wasn’t involved in the study, said by email.

Crain's Chicago Business 0

Research is beginning to show that growth in food allergies may be slowing, according to Ruchi Gupta, M.D., a pediatrics professor and director of the Science & Outcomes of Allergy & Asthma Research program at Lurie Children’s Hospital. Scientists at both academic institutions and Silicon Valley startups are racing to untangle the mysteries of the immune system in order to create food allergy vaccines and cures. What’s more, exposure therapy—in which parents and doctors try to gradually increase a child’s tolerance by giving them tiny amounts of a food to which they are allergic—is growing in popularity. So far, though, there’s been no medical breakthrough. “Research takes a long time, and we don’t know if (daily exposure treatments) are a cure because there are no long-term studies,” Gupta says.

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