Media Coverage

The work done by Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine faculty members (and even some students) is regularly highlighted in newspapers, online media outlets and more. Below you’ll find links to articles and videos of Feinberg in the news.

Chicago Tribune 0

Northwestern University’s medical school has launched a website featuring animated characters Olivia the Ovary and Timothy the Testis to teach reproductive health to children. The site, called Reprotopia, features the dancing duo in animated videos that explain reproduction, aimed at children ages 10 to 14.

“Timothy and Olivia are a neat way for kids to de-sensationalize the words ovary and testis,” Dr. Teresa Woodruff, director of the Oncofertility Consortium at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, who helped create the series, stated in Monday’s release. “If we can do that for these common terms, it will be easier for kids to access the information they need for their health as they get older. This removes the taboos to talk about it by giving the kids the terms early enough, so it doesn’t sound ‘dirty.'”

The New York Times Magazine 0

In effect, the pledge to be generous primed people to be more giving. There are probably evolutionary undercurrents to this process, says Thorsten Kahnt , , who was a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Zurich and co-author of the study and is now an assistant professor of neurology at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago. Our early ancestors might not have been so eager to share food and labor with one another, he suggests, if those actions didn’t entail some reward — including the potent, if abstract, reward of happiness. Though the experiment lasted only a short time and involved only simulated gains and losses, Kahnt says that “it does show a mechanistic linkage in the brain between doing something nice for someone and feeling better about yourself.”

The New York Times 0

In July, at the Ovarian Cancer National Conference in Chicago, a succession of experts expressed alarm about this: Dr. John Moroney from the University of Chicago, Dr. Carol L. Brown from Memorial Sloan Kettering, Dr. David Gershenson from MD Anderson Cancer Center, Dr. Daniela Matei , from Northwestern University, and Dr. Alan D’Andrea from the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.

Fox News (National) 0

Dr. Clyde Yancy , chief of cardiology at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine, said the Heart to Heart program offers a “very teachable moment” for healthcare providers who are always searching for times when they have the rapt attention of patients. Allowing transplant patients to hold their heart in their hands “may be sufficient to empower them and reinforce the message for patients and in their role as advocates,” especially for those who are visual learners, he said. “If it doesn’t affect change then it becomes an exercise that comes with a cost and some risk because we don’t always know what the patient’s reaction will be,” he said. “We’re all looking for ways to change adult behaviors, so it would be wonderful if the program was shown to effect change,” Yancy added.

Today 0

Many skin moisturizers that claim to be fragrance-free or hypoallergenic are not, and may aggravate skin disorders such as psoriasis and eczema, a new study says. Northwestern University researchers examined the top 100 best-selling, whole-body moisturizers sold at Amazon, Target and Walmart for affordability and content. They found that 83 percent of so-called hypoallergenic products had a potentially allergenic chemical.

TIME Magazine 0

Many skin moisturizers that claim to be fragrance-free or hypoallergenic are not, and may aggravate skin disorders such as psoriasis and eczema, a new study says. Northwestern University researchers examined the top 100 best-selling, whole-body moisturizers sold at Amazon, Target and Walmart for affordability and content. They found that 83 percent of so-called hypoallergenic products had a potentially allergenic chemical.

U.S. News & World Report 0

Many skin moisturizers that claim to be fragrance-free or hypoallergenic are not, and may aggravate skin disorders such as psoriasis and eczema, a new study says. Northwestern University researchers examined the top 100 best-selling, whole-body moisturizers sold at Amazon, Target and Walmart for affordability and content. They found that 83 percent of so-called hypoallergenic products had a potentially allergenic chemical.

HealthDay 0

Many skin moisturizers that claim to be fragrance-free or hypoallergenic are not, and may aggravate skin disorders such as psoriasis and eczema, a new study says. Northwestern University researchers examined the top 100 best-selling, whole-body moisturizers sold at Amazon, Target and Walmart for affordability and content. They found that 83 percent of so-called hypoallergenic products had a potentially allergenic chemical.

Reuters 0

Preventive Medicine at the Feinberg School of Medicine
This study adds encouraging evidence that as people spent more time being physically active, the lower the chance they experienced harmful effects from being sedentary,” said Dorothy Dunlop , a researcher at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago who wasn’t involved in the research.

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