Media Coverage

The work done by Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine faculty members (and even some students) is regularly highlighted in newspapers, online media outlets and more. Below you’ll find links to articles and videos of Feinberg in the news.

HealthDay 0

Overweight and obese people tend to develop heart disease at an earlier age, living with chronic illness for much longer than those of a healthy weight, a new study shows. These findings show that even though some may benefit from an “obesity paradox” — where people with excess weight live longer than those of normal weight — those extra years of life could be filled with illness and misery, said lead researcher Dr. Sadiya Khan, an instructor at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago. “Individuals in the overweight category really live about the same amount of time,” Khan said. “It was really the difference about how long they lived with cardiovascular disease because they developed the disease earlier in life.”

TODAY 0

Deep sleep is critical to maintaining a robust memory, but both decline with age. A small new study published in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience suggests that one easy way for older adults to get deeper sleep and stronger memories is to listen to a certain soothing sound called “pink noise”—a mix of high and low frequencies that sounds more balanced and natural than its better-known cousin, “white noise.” It may sound strange, but previous studies have found that playing so-called pink noise during sleep improves the memory of younger adults. “We wanted to see if it would work in older people, too,” says senior author Dr. Phyllis Zee, professor of neurology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine.

TIME Magazine 0

Deep sleep is critical to maintaining a robust memory, but both decline with age. A small new study published in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience suggests that one easy way for older adults to get deeper sleep and stronger memories is to listen to a certain soothing sound called “pink noise”—a mix of high and low frequencies that sounds more balanced and natural than its better-known cousin, “white noise.” It may sound strange, but previous studies have found that playing so-called pink noise during sleep improves the memory of younger adults. “We wanted to see if it would work in older people, too,” says senior author Dr. Phyllis Zee, professor of neurology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine.

Crain's Chicago Business 0

John Potocsnak, CEO of Corrugated Supplies of Bedford Park, has donated $15 million to Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine. The gift, announced today, will support the Louis A. Simpson and Kimberly K. Querrey Biomedical Research Center.

The Washington Post 0

“Over the course of the last 15 or 20 years, the burden of arthritis has only been growing,” said Rowland Chang, professor at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, a rheumatologist at the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago and chair of the Arthritis Foundation Board of Directors. Like the CDC, the Arthritis Foundation hopes to improve the lives of people with arthritis. “The foundation really believes we need to accelerate research into the pharmaceutical side to find better treatments for osteoarthritis because if we don’t, we won’t be able to bend the cost curve in this country,” Chang said.

Chicago Tribune 0

It’s hard to mess up. There are many shades of gray when it comes to things like how to get a baby to sleep, to eat and to develop in the best way possible, said Scott Goldstein, pediatrician with The Northwestern Children’s Practice, instructor at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and father of three. “This means that by doing what you feel comfortable with, you — and your baby — will almost always be just fine,” Goldstein said. “The issues your child will have when they are an adult will most likely not be traced back to anything you did in the first year.”

TODAY 0

Dr. Lauren Streicher isn’t quite ready to accept that affection accounts for most of the happy buzz we get from sex. What they found was an association, said Streicher, an associate professor of clinical obstetrics and gynecology at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine and medical director of Northwestern’s Medical Center for Sexual Medicine and Menopause. There are studies showing that if you have more sex, you live longer, Streicher said. “But it’s also true that if you are healthier you will have more sex,” she added.

Reuters 0

“We cannot draw large conclusions about overall hospital safety from this study since the primary research question was how to improve error detection, reporting and formal cataloging and the authors do not draw conclusions on overall hospital safety from their results,” said Dr. Irini Kolaitis, a researcher at the Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago and Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. “The key finding from this study is that both clinicians and parents accurately recognize medical errors and adverse events, but the use of hospital reporting systems lags behind,” Kolaitis, who wasn’t involved in the study, added by email.

HealthDay 0

Whether you’re nearsighted or not might come down to one particular type of cell in your retina, a new mouse study suggests. Researchers from Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago report that this cell is highly sensitive to light and controls how the eye develops.

U.S. News and World Report 0

“There’s definitely roles for physicians who want to be more politically active and want to make a difference in government,” says Dr. Joel Shalowitz, professor of preventive medicine at the Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University. Doctors who want to become health care administrators in the private sector may need to earn an additional graduate degree, says Shalowitz, who has both an M.D. and an MBA. Shalowitz serves as professor of executive education at Northwestern’s Kellogg School of Management and previously served as the school’s clinical professor of health industry management as well as the director of its health industry management program. Even if you go into a medical school with a specific career track in mind, you are highly likely to change your mind, Shalowitz says. “It’s okay if people don’t know exactly what they want, because that is what the medical school experience is about finding out.”

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