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NPR 0

“The greater cause of the stagnation in cardiovascular death rates is that the obesity epidemic, which started in this country in about 1985, is finally coming home to roost,” says Donald Lloyd-Jones, a physician and chair of the department of preventive medicine at Northwestern University.

Reuters 0

Women who enter menopause before age 45 are more likely to have cardiovascular problems and to die younger than women who enter menopause later in life, according to a new analysis. Women in Western populations enter menopause at an average age of 51, write Dr. JoAnn Manson, of Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, and Teresa Woodruff, of Northwestern University in Chicago, in an editorial accompanying the new analysis. Professional societies agree that women with early menopause should be considered for hormone therapy – if eligible – to manage symptoms and protect bone and vascular health, Manson and Woodruff write.

Fox News (National) 0

“When we talk about pneumonia, we don’t necessarily talk about whether it’s communicable or not unless it’s one of the diseases of great public interest, such as influenza, Legionnaire’s disease, and tuberculosis,” Dr. Richard Wunderink, professor of pulmonary and critical care at Northwestern Medicine, told FoxNews.com. “It’s very important to report tuberculosis, but we don’t even report if you have, say, pneumococcal pneumonia, the most common bacterial pneumonia, or mycoplasma pneumonia, another common bacterial pneumonia.”

Early menopause tied to heart risk and early death
Reuters, 9/15
Andrew M. Seaman
Women who enter menopause before age 45 are more likely to have cardiovascular problems and to die younger than women who enter menopause later in life, according to a new analysis. Women in Western populations enter menopause at an average age of 51, write Dr. JoAnn Manson, of Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, and Teresa Woodruff, of Northwestern University in Chicago, in an editorial accompanying the new analysis. Professional societies agree that women with early menopause should be considered for hormone therapy – if eligible – to manage symptoms and protect bone and vascular health, Manson and Woodruff write.

Huffington Post 0

In a study recently presented at the International Conference on Memory in Budapest, researchers examined 62 super agers and found that their brains shrink at a much slower rate than the brains of other people. But if there’s a habit all super agers have in common, researchers haven’t found it yet. “They don’t all have pristine diets or exercise regimens ― some of them drink, and some have been smoking for many years,” Emily Rogalski of Northwestern University told New Scientist. “They don’t all have a high IQ, and they aren’t all doctors and lawyers. Their health history is very variable, but cognitively, they’re doing much better than their peers.”

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