Media Coverage

The New York Times 0

The developers of enzalutamide, Pfizer and Astellas Pharma, have applied to the F.D.A. for approval to expand the use of the drug, marketed as Xtandi, to patients in this category, said Dr. Maha Hussain, deputy director of the Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine. She co-led that study with Dr. Cora Sternberg, chief of medical oncology at San Camillo and Forlanini Hospitals in Rome.

Reuters 0

“The seasonal shift in sun intensity in Illinois means that sun safety receives less attention than health promotion activities that apply all year such as good nutrition, adequate exercise and brushing teeth,” said senior study author Dr. June Robinson of the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago. While about half of the daycare programs did provide sunscreen for students, 77 percent of these programs didn’t allow kids to apply the sunscreen themselves, researchers report in JAMA Dermatology.

San Francisco Chronicle 0

Emergency rooms have been called the hospital’s front door, so that’s where reformers are starting. “The emergency department is not designed with older adults in mind,” said Dr. Scott Dresden, who heads the Geriatric Emergency Department Innovations program at Northwestern. “You’ve got really thin stretchers. You’ve got patients in the hallway. There’s mechanical noise all around.” Early research at Northwestern and other hospitals shows care from geriatrics-trained nurses in the ER can reduce the chances of a hospital stay after a patient’s emergency visit and for a month afterward.

Chicago Tribune 0

Contrary to popular belief, it’s the fathers whose stress levels rise when bringing premature NICU babies home from the hospital — while the mothers’ stress levels stay constant, according to a new study by researchers at Northwestern Medicine. They found that before being discharged from the NICU, both parents had high levels of cortisol, the stress hormone. But during the two weeks after being discharged, the mothers’ stress levels returned to normal, while the fathers’ continued to rise. When the babies are in the hospital, they’re cared for by a team of nurses and physicians, said Craig Garfield, lead author of the study, and associate professor of pediatrics and medical social sciences at Northwestern University.

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