Media Coverage

The work done by Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine faculty members (and even some students) is regularly highlighted in newspapers, online media outlets and more. Below you’ll find links to articles and videos of Feinberg in the news.

TODAY 0

Gastroenterologist Dr. Arvydas Vanagunas
says he’s seen one or two patients with the infection. “The main symptom is pretty severe abdominal pain that typically occurs within hours of consuming raw or undercooked fish,” said Vanagunas, a professor of medicine at the Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University and Northwestern Memorial Hospital.

Chicago Tribune 0

“We have a lot of patients who are able to maintain reproductive function despite cancer treatment,” said John Lurain , Marsella’s oncologist at Northwestern Memorial Hospital. “We do everything we can to preserve reproductive function if we’re able to do so without putting a patient’s life at risk. And very often, we are able to do so.”

Chicago Tribune 0

Samer Attar, 41, an orthopedic surgeon at Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago, told no one about his June trip to Aleppo. In addition to packing scrubs and a toothbrush, he wrote a farewell letter to his family and gave it to a friend in case he did not return. “Some days we’d be so overrun there would be no place to step,” said Attar, an American-born son of Syrian immigrants who didn’t want to look back in 20 years and say he wasn’t part of the relief effort in the country of his heritage. “I still get chills thinking of people pounding on the doors trying to get into the hospital to be taken care of.”

ABC-Chicago (republished from Associated Press) 0

The biggest criticism of the proposed law appears to be its repeal of Obamacare standards of care. Many health policy groups agree with Northwestern University’s Center for Healthcare Studies that those with pre-existing conditions may well be left out. “This now allows insurers to charge higher rates to people who may be sicker, and typically people who are sicker, they can’t work as much so paying higher rates can be quite a problem and results in not allowing them to get the care they need,” said Dr. Jane Holl.

TODAY 0

“The truth of the matter is, when most people learn about this stuff, they’re in seventh grade,” Dr. Lauren Streicher , an associate clinical professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Northwestern University’s Medical School and author of “Sex Rx: Hormones, Health, and Your Best Sex Ever,” told TODAY. “Women who are otherwise very savvy and educated, and know a lot about their bodies, really don’t know a lot about what’s supposed to happen and what’s not supposed to happen.” Streicher provides a lot of expertise throughout the rest of the article.

HealthDay 0

It may not come as a surprise, but a new study suggests that people who reach middle age in good heart health can look forward to a longer, healthier life. “It’s not just about quantity, but also quality of life,” said study leader Norrina Allen, an assistant professor of preventive medicine at Northwestern University, in Chicago.

HealthDay 0

Young adults with uncomplicated epilepsy who remain seizure-free do as well as siblings without the disorder in education, employment, driving and independent living, a new study says. “Our study provides further evidence that children growing up with uncomplicated epilepsy who stay seizure-free have a favorable prognosis,” said senior author Anne Berg, a research professor at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago. “However, if they do not achieve five-year seizure remission, young adults with uncomplicated epilepsy are less likely to drive and graduate high school. They also tend to be less productively engaged and not live independently. These results show how critically important it is to control seizures,” she added.

NPR 0

The bottom line health message from the study is this: If you succeed in losing weight, then you should work just as hard to keep it off, says Linda Van Horn, a registered dietitian and professor of preventive medicine at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine and a spokesperson for the American Heart Association. Unfortunately, keeping the pounds off can be more difficult as people age, Van Horn says. “The older we get the fewer calories we need,” she says. “If a person who is 60 is eating the same number of calories they ate when they were 20, they will be considerably heavier,” she says, even if there has been no change in physical activity. That’s because metabolism decreases over time, starting in the mid-20s. So, as people age, it’s even more important to keep an eye on the scale and cut back when weight increases, Van Horn says. “It’s a lot easier to gain than it is to lose.”

TODAY 0

In the vast majority of cases, urinary tract infections (UTIs) don’t spread to the kidneys, according to Dr. Sarah Flury, a urologist at Northwestern University. There are about 6 million urinary tract infections each year in the United States and about 250,000 kidney infections, Flury added.

Chicago Tribune 0

Some also question the effectiveness of such testing. Rex Chisholm, vice dean for scientific affairs at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine, said he’s a believer in pharmacogenomic testing, but it’s important to move carefully when rolling out such testing widely. Northwestern also has been running a study on pharmacogenomic testing. “It’s always a judgment call about how early in a new technology and development … do you actually want to be an adopter,” Chisholm said. “We want to have some additional evidence before we would go full-out and offer it to all our patients.”

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