Media Coverage

The work done by Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine faculty members (and even some students) is regularly highlighted in newspapers, online media outlets and more. Below you’ll find links to articles and videos of Feinberg in the news.

BBC News 0

WHAT CAUSES FLUID IN THE LUNGS AND BRAIN? A virus? An overdose? Alcohol poisoning? Yes, yes and yes. There’s a long list, said Dr. Patrick Lank, a Northwestern Medicine assistant professor of emergency medicine in Chicago. “One of the more common things we see in the emergency department is related to drug overdose,” Lank said. “Alcohol would be a really common one. Also, cocaine, heroin and other opioids, or MDMA, which also is known as ecstasy or molly.” Viral infection could cause both pulmonary and cerebral edema, Lank said. “Trauma would be another potential cause” but would likely cause external marks. “Two people at the same time is odd,” Lank said. “It suggests more of a toxicologic or environmental cause, or a potential infection if they’re traveling together.”

Yahoo News! 0

WHAT CAUSES FLUID IN THE LUNGS AND BRAIN? A virus? An overdose? Alcohol poisoning? Yes, yes and yes. There’s a long list, said Dr. Patrick Lank, a Northwestern Medicine assistant professor of emergency medicine in Chicago. “One of the more common things we see in the emergency department is related to drug overdose,” Lank said. “Alcohol would be a really common one. Also, cocaine, heroin and other opioids, or MDMA, which also is known as ecstasy or molly.” Viral infection could cause both pulmonary and cerebral edema, Lank said. “Trauma would be another potential cause” but would likely cause external marks. “Two people at the same time is odd,” Lank said. “It suggests more of a toxicologic or environmental cause, or a potential infection if they’re traveling together.”

Fox News (National) 0

WHAT CAUSES FLUID IN THE LUNGS AND BRAIN? A virus? An overdose? Alcohol poisoning? Yes, yes and yes. There’s a long list, said Dr. Patrick Lank, a Northwestern Medicine assistant professor of emergency medicine in Chicago. “One of the more common things we see in the emergency department is related to drug overdose,” Lank said. “Alcohol would be a really common one. Also, cocaine, heroin and other opioids, or MDMA, which also is known as ecstasy or molly.” Viral infection could cause both pulmonary and cerebral edema, Lank said. “Trauma would be another potential cause” but would likely cause external marks. “Two people at the same time is odd,” Lank said. “It suggests more of a toxicologic or environmental cause, or a potential infection if they’re traveling together.”

ABC News (National) 0

WHAT CAUSES FLUID IN THE LUNGS AND BRAIN? A virus? An overdose? Alcohol poisoning? Yes, yes and yes. There’s a long list, said Dr. Patrick Lank, a Northwestern Medicine assistant professor of emergency medicine in Chicago. “One of the more common things we see in the emergency department is related to drug overdose,” Lank said. “Alcohol would be a really common one. Also, cocaine, heroin and other opioids, or MDMA, which also is known as ecstasy or molly.” Viral infection could cause both pulmonary and cerebral edema, Lank said. “Trauma would be another potential cause” but would likely cause external marks. “Two people at the same time is odd,” Lank said. “It suggests more of a toxicologic or environmental cause, or a potential infection if they’re traveling together.”

The New York Times 0

WHAT CAUSES FLUID IN THE LUNGS AND BRAIN? A virus? An overdose? Alcohol poisoning? Yes, yes and yes. There’s a long list, said Dr. Patrick Lank, a Northwestern Medicine assistant professor of emergency medicine in Chicago. “One of the more common things we see in the emergency department is related to drug overdose,” Lank said. “Alcohol would be a really common one. Also, cocaine, heroin and other opioids, or MDMA, which also is known as ecstasy or molly.” Viral infection could cause both pulmonary and cerebral edema, Lank said. “Trauma would be another potential cause” but would likely cause external marks. “Two people at the same time is odd,” Lank said. “It suggests more of a toxicologic or environmental cause, or a potential infection if they’re traveling together.”

Associated Press 0

WHAT CAUSES FLUID IN THE LUNGS AND BRAIN? A virus? An overdose? Alcohol poisoning? Yes, yes and yes. There’s a long list, said Dr. Patrick Lank, a Northwestern Medicine assistant professor of emergency medicine in Chicago. “One of the more common things we see in the emergency department is related to drug overdose,” Lank said. “Alcohol would be a really common one. Also, cocaine, heroin and other opioids, or MDMA, which also is known as ecstasy or molly.” Viral infection could cause both pulmonary and cerebral edema, Lank said. “Trauma would be another potential cause” but would likely cause external marks. “Two people at the same time is odd,” Lank said. “It suggests more of a toxicologic or environmental cause, or a potential infection if they’re traveling together.”

U.S. News & World Report 0

“As you age, your sleep becomes more fragmented. You get less slow wave, or deep sleep, and this is most associated with restoration of physical and mental health,” says Kelly Glazer Baron, assistant processor of neurology at the Northwestern Feinberg School of Medicine. In 2013, her research with colleagues found that low-intensity walking or running three times a week resulted in better nights of sleep for women over age 55 with insomnia.

The New York Times 0

Many doctors provide no treatments other than perhaps creams and ointments that do not stop the itching or soothe the red and weeping rash, said Dr. Jonathan I. Silverberg of Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine and a principal investigator in one of the studies. “What we are seeing are some really impressive efficacy numbers,” Dr. Silverberg said. “But efficacy alone is not enough. It is the safety profile that is the real key. Everything we are seeing really looks great.”

Business Insider 0

Scientists in the United States have successfully treated broken spines and skulls in animals using 3D-printed synthetic bone, opening the possibility of future personalized bone implants for humans to fix dental, spinal other bone injuries. “Another unique property … is that it’s highly porous and absorbent – and this is important for cell and tissue integration,” said Ramille Shah of Northwestern University’s department of material science, engineering and surgery, who co-led the work. With this hyper-elastic bone, however, many of those issues would be overcome, said Adam Jakus, Shah’s co-researcher at Northwestern University. “It’s purely synthetic, very cheap and very easy to make,” he said. “It can be packaged, shipped and stored very nicely.”

Fox News (National) 0

Scientists in the United States have successfully treated broken spines and skulls in animals using 3D-printed synthetic bone, opening the possibility of future personalized bone implants for humans to fix dental, spinal other bone injuries. “Another unique property … is that it’s highly porous and absorbent – and this is important for cell and tissue integration,” said Ramille Shah of Northwestern University’s department of material science, engineering and surgery, who co-led the work. With this hyper-elastic bone, however, many of those issues would be overcome, said Adam Jakus, Shah’s co-researcher at Northwestern University. “It’s purely synthetic, very cheap and very easy to make,” he said. “It can be packaged, shipped and stored very nicely.”

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