Media Coverage

The work done by Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine faculty members (and even some students) is regularly highlighted in newspapers, online media outlets and more. Below you’ll find links to articles and videos of Feinberg in the news.

The New York Times 0

Dr. Marilyn Cornelis, an assistant professor at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, said her research had identified many genes involved in caffeine metabolism, and that relying on only one or two genetic factors could provide people with a false sense of reassurance. “There are clearly other genetic and environmental factors contributing to differences in caffeine metabolism,” she said. “And these are not captured by existing tests.”

HealthDay 0

“We found moderate to vigorous physical activity actually benefits women psychologically and that, in turn, helps their memory,” said the study’s lead author, Siobhan Phillips. She is assistant professor of preventive medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.

Chicago Tribune 0

Breast cancer survivors who exercised more were less likely to report memory problems in a new study by researchers at Northwestern University and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The study looked at moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, such as brisk walking, biking and jogging, and complaints of memory problems, which are common among breast cancer survivors. “Exercise may provide a way to cope with some of the stress experienced during and following a cancer diagnosis and may help women to feel more confident that they can cope with the cancer experience,” said lead author Siobhan Phillips, an assistant professor of preventive medicine at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, via email.

HealthDay 0

“The results were surprising in some ways,” said study author Dr. Steve Xu, a resident in the department of dermatology at the McGaw Medical Center of Northwestern University, in Chicago.

“But, there are some important caveats,” he added. “The definition of a ‘sunscreen’ has broadened a lot. Sunscreens are no longer just bright blue bottles thrown in beach bags,” he noted, with less-protective moisturizers now often substituting for more sunscreen-specific products.

Fox News 0

Researchers at Northwestern University found that about 40 percent of the most popular sunscreens on the website do not meet the American Academy of Dermatology’s quality guidelines, including water or sweat resistance. Their study, published Wednesday in JAMA Dermatology, also suggested consumers spend an estimated 3,000 percent more on products than necessary.

CNN (National) 0

Dermatologists “are often asked to recommend sunscreens, and we wanted to know what consumers prefer,” said lead study author Dr. Steve Xu. “This way, we are suggesting popular products they will actually use that will protect them.”

CBS News (National) 0

“The results were surprising in some ways,” said study author Dr. Steve Xu, a resident in the department of dermatology at the McGaw Medical Center of Northwestern University, in Chicago.

Play VIDEO
Sunscreen ingredients can cause allergic reactions
“But, there are some important caveats,” he added. “The definition of a ‘sunscreen’ has broadened a lot. Sunscreens are no longer just bright blue bottles thrown in beach bags,” he noted, with less-protective moisturizers now often substituting for more sunscreen-specific products.

ABC News 0

Researchers from multiple institutions, including Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago, looked at the top-rated one percent of sunscreens on Amazon to see whether people are picking the sunscreens that provide the best protection. Researchers picked the sunscreens that had both the highest ratings and highest number of reviews by consumers on Amazon.

The Washington Post 0

Along with normalizing bowel movements, fiber-heavy foods can be helpful in weight loss. Foods with lots of fiber tends to have fewer calories for the same volume of food. That’s key for maintaining a healthy body-mass index and diet, said Linda Van Horn, a nutrition professor at Northwestern University’s medical school. “You feel fuller when you’ve consumed those kinds of food,” Van Horn said. “That’s why any high-fiber whole grain provides this sense of fullness that helps you to reduce your total intake of calories.”

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