Media Coverage

The work done by Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine faculty members (and even some students) is regularly highlighted in newspapers, online media outlets and more. Below you’ll find links to articles and videos of Feinberg in the news.

Los Angeles Times 0

A new study published this week in Pediatrics found that food-allergic children from households that earn less than $50,000 a year incur 2.5 times the cost of emergency room visits and hospital stays compared with their peers from families that are in a higher-income bracket.

Dr. Ruchi Gupta, an associate professor of pediatrics at Northwestern University who led the study, said the findings suggest that caregivers from households with the lowest incomes may not be able to afford preventative treatment for their food-allergic children.

U.S. News & World Report 0

“We discovered the zinc spark just five years ago in the mouse, and to see the zinc radiate out in a burst from each human egg was breathtaking,” said one of the study’s senior authors, Teresa Woodruff, Thomas J. Watkins Memorial Professor in Obstetrics and Gynecology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and director of Northwestern’s Center for Reproductive Science, in a press release.

UPI 0

Hydrocortisone may prevent bronchopulmonary dysplasia, or BPD, in premature newborns given oxygen treatments after birth, according to a recent study…
“Supplemental oxygen has been our standard treatment for critically ill preemies, and while needed, it’s not without risk,” Dr. Kathryn Farrow, a neonatologist at Lurie Children’s Hospital and an associate professor of pediatrics at Northwestern University, said in a press release. “Our findings provide new insights and new possible pathways to mitigate or completely eliminate the damaging side effects of an otherwise lifesaving therapy.”

The Telegram & Gazette 0

Not only are African-American men approximately 125 percent more likely than Caucasians to develop prostate cancer, they are also 150 percent more likely to die, especially young men in their 40s, because of a more aggressive form of the malignancy…Early detection holds the most promise to save the lives of African-American men and men of African descent, according to Dr. William J. Catalona, a prostate cancer surgeon who pioneered the development of PSA testing.
But Dr. Catalona is now seeing in his practice at Northwestern Memorial Hospital, the teaching hospital for Northwestern University’s School of Medicine, an increasing number of men from all racial backgrounds coming in with more advanced stage prostate cancer.

The New York Times 0

The puffiness along Carol Ascher’s left leg seemed like normal swelling, probably from the high dose of chemotherapy Dr. Karl Bilimoria had injected the previous day. But it could have been a blood clot. He quickly ordered an ultrasound. “We were just being abundantly cautious,” he said.

Such vigilance is a point of pride at Northwestern Memorial Hospital. But the hospital’s tests have identified so many infections and serious blood clots that the federal government is cutting the institution’s Medicare payments for a year, by about $1.6 million. Nearly half of the nation’s academic medical centers are being punished similarly through one of the federal government’s sternest attempts to promote patient safety.

Fox News 0

Anthony Yang, MD, assistant professor of surgery – surgical oncology at the Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University in Chicago and colleagues collected the perceptions of the surgical faculty who oversaw the training programs. Where residents had flexible work hours, program directors said the trainees used the time to finish operations and the stabilize patients. Compared to program directors at hospitals with restricted work hours, those with flexible hours overwhelmingly reported more positive effects on patient safety, uninterrupted patient care and freedom for residents to attend educational

Crain's Chicago Business 0

Employers are increasingly recognizing the potential of individuals with autism—AT&T, Microsoft and the Israeli Army, to name a few. Several companies recently announced the 5,000 Initiative: Autism in Tech Workforce, a national campaign with the aim of employing 5,000 people on the autism spectrum in technology positions by 2020.

Our research and clinical experience suggest that this may only be the start. Indeed, people with autism have unique qualities, including heightened visual perception skills and attention to detail, that can be of great value to employers, especially in fields where innovation is key.

The Washington Post 0

Experts who weren’t involved in the project said the results hold promise. Lee Miller of Northwestern University, who has done similar research in monkeys, called the results “an important step” toward developing a tool for helping patients. He agreed that the forearm electrodes would probably have to be implanted, but he said the current approach is “clearly a good starting point.”

The New York Times 0

Experts who weren’t involved in the project said the results hold promise. Lee Miller of Northwestern University, who has done similar research in monkeys, called the results “an important step” toward developing a tool for helping patients. He agreed that the forearm electrodes would probably have to be implanted, but he said the current approach is “clearly a good starting point.”

Chicago Tribune 0

Lee Miller of Northwestern University, who has done similar research in monkeys, called the results “an important step” toward developing a tool for helping patients. He agreed that the forearm electrodes would probably have to be implanted, but he said the current approach is “clearly a good starting point.”

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