Media Coverage

The work done by Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine faculty members (and even some students) is regularly highlighted in newspapers, online media outlets and more. Below you’ll find links to articles and videos of Feinberg in the news.

The Washington Post 0

“It’s a fascinating report — one of those things that comes out of the blue,” said Dr. June Robinson , a Northwestern University research professor in dermatology. Robinson is also editor of the medical journal JAMA Dermatology, which published the study online this month. She said the results deserve a deeper look but cautioned that it’s way too soon to suggest that they might lead to new treatments for gray hair.

The New York Times 0

“It’s a fascinating report — one of those things that comes out of the blue,” said Dr. June Robinson , a Northwestern University research professor in dermatology. Robinson is also editor of the medical journal JAMA Dermatology, which published the study online this month. She said the results deserve a deeper look but cautioned that it’s way too soon to suggest that they might lead to new treatments for gray hair.

Associated Press 0

“It’s a fascinating report — one of those things that comes out of the blue,” said Dr. June Robinson , a Northwestern University research professor in dermatology. Robinson is also editor of the medical journal JAMA Dermatology, which published the study online this month. She said the results deserve a deeper look but cautioned that it’s way too soon to suggest that they might lead to new treatments for gray hair.

The New York Times 0

But the sensor cannot accomplish these tasks alone. “It’s not a full integrated electronic system,” said John A. Rogers , a professor of materials science and engineering at Northwestern University, who was not involved in the study. It needs to be combined with a power source and devices to read and transfer the data. “It’s a component of a broader system that could have utility.”

U.S. News & World Report 0

“That (recovery) usually takes about 10 to 14 days before starting therapy,” said Dr. Maciej Lesniak, chair of neurological surgery at Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago. The treatment is usually very well tolerated, Lesniak said. “Generally, people can maintain normal quality of life during therapy including their work in the majority of cases.”

Reuters 0

“That (recovery) usually takes about 10 to 14 days before starting therapy,” said Dr. Maciej Lesniak, chair of neurological surgery at Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago. The treatment is usually very well tolerated, Lesniak said. “Generally, people can maintain normal quality of life during therapy including their work in the majority of cases.”

Reuters 0

“That (recovery) usually takes about 10 to 14 days before starting therapy,” said Dr. Maciej Lesniak, chair of neurological surgery at Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago. The treatment is usually very well tolerated, Lesniak said. “Generally, people can maintain normal quality of life during therapy including their work in the majority of cases.”

Reuters 0

Even though some in the medical community have expressed concerns that efforts to lower readmissions might give doctors an incentive to inappropriately keep patients out of the hospital who need to return for additional care, the study offers fresh evidence that this doesn’t happen, said Dr. Karl Bilimoria , director of the Surgical Outcomes and Quality Improvement Center at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago. “While some may suggest this, most of us have not given this argument credence – doctors will still do the right thing and readmit patients when it is medically needed,” Bilimoria, who wasn’t involved in the study, said by email.

U.S. News & World Report 0

It’s called stress-induced cardiomyopathy, and it’s one of the more perplexing disorders for cardiologists. “It’s a fascinating condition,” says Dr. Chintan Desai , a cardiovascular disease specialist at Northwestern Medicine Regional Medical Group in Illinois. “We see it in people who have suffered severe emotional distress – a widow at her husband’s funeral, hearing a child is in a bad accident.”

New York Post 0

But not all docs encourage holistic preconception rituals. Lauren Streicher, MD, ,an associate clinical professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Northwestern University in Illinois, says, “I sometimes worry there’s this false assurance that [if you] eat organic or take yoga classes before you’re pregnant, then everything will work out. And if it doesn’t, if a woman has trouble conceiving or has a baby with a birth defect, then women blame themselves, when there are no studies to show massage or acupuncture or organic foods make a difference in outcome. Bottom line, there’s a lot we can’t control, so women shouldn’t go nuts focusing on these things. They should do them if it feels good, but not at the expense of a balanced life.”

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