Media Coverage

The work done by Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine faculty members (and even some students) is regularly highlighted in newspapers, online media outlets and more. Below you’ll find links to articles and videos of Feinberg in the news.

The Washington Post 0

Written by, Samer Attar, MD, assistant professor of Orthopaedic Surgery
The genocide of our times keeps getting shoved out of sight and out of mind, but enough is enough. President Obama still has a chance to stand up for the Syrian people.

Chicago Tribune 0

Someday soon, customized bone implants could be as easy as a doctor scanning your body and switching on a 3D printer. Ramille Shah, an assistant professor at Northwestern University, led the research on a new synthetic bone-replacement material.

U.S. News & World Report 0

“We all have these biases – they are the lenses through which we process information and they are a necessary part of the information-selection process,” says Mark Reinecke, professor and chief psychologist at Northwestern University and Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago. Even physicians and mental health professionals have cognitive biases when making decisions for their own health and while treating patients.

Today 0

“The PSA test is a powerful tool that has to be used and interpreted in the right way,” said Dr. Edward M. Schaeffer, Stiller’s surgeon, and chair of urology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and Northwestern Medicine. “Whether or not to get the test should be a shared decision-making process with a man and his doctor.”

BBC News 0

WHAT CAUSES FLUID IN THE LUNGS AND BRAIN? A virus? An overdose? Alcohol poisoning? Yes, yes and yes. There’s a long list, said Dr. Patrick Lank, a Northwestern Medicine assistant professor of emergency medicine in Chicago. “One of the more common things we see in the emergency department is related to drug overdose,” Lank said. “Alcohol would be a really common one. Also, cocaine, heroin and other opioids, or MDMA, which also is known as ecstasy or molly.” Viral infection could cause both pulmonary and cerebral edema, Lank said. “Trauma would be another potential cause” but would likely cause external marks. “Two people at the same time is odd,” Lank said. “It suggests more of a toxicologic or environmental cause, or a potential infection if they’re traveling together.”

Yahoo News! 0

WHAT CAUSES FLUID IN THE LUNGS AND BRAIN? A virus? An overdose? Alcohol poisoning? Yes, yes and yes. There’s a long list, said Dr. Patrick Lank, a Northwestern Medicine assistant professor of emergency medicine in Chicago. “One of the more common things we see in the emergency department is related to drug overdose,” Lank said. “Alcohol would be a really common one. Also, cocaine, heroin and other opioids, or MDMA, which also is known as ecstasy or molly.” Viral infection could cause both pulmonary and cerebral edema, Lank said. “Trauma would be another potential cause” but would likely cause external marks. “Two people at the same time is odd,” Lank said. “It suggests more of a toxicologic or environmental cause, or a potential infection if they’re traveling together.”

Fox News (National) 0

WHAT CAUSES FLUID IN THE LUNGS AND BRAIN? A virus? An overdose? Alcohol poisoning? Yes, yes and yes. There’s a long list, said Dr. Patrick Lank, a Northwestern Medicine assistant professor of emergency medicine in Chicago. “One of the more common things we see in the emergency department is related to drug overdose,” Lank said. “Alcohol would be a really common one. Also, cocaine, heroin and other opioids, or MDMA, which also is known as ecstasy or molly.” Viral infection could cause both pulmonary and cerebral edema, Lank said. “Trauma would be another potential cause” but would likely cause external marks. “Two people at the same time is odd,” Lank said. “It suggests more of a toxicologic or environmental cause, or a potential infection if they’re traveling together.”

ABC News (National) 0

WHAT CAUSES FLUID IN THE LUNGS AND BRAIN? A virus? An overdose? Alcohol poisoning? Yes, yes and yes. There’s a long list, said Dr. Patrick Lank, a Northwestern Medicine assistant professor of emergency medicine in Chicago. “One of the more common things we see in the emergency department is related to drug overdose,” Lank said. “Alcohol would be a really common one. Also, cocaine, heroin and other opioids, or MDMA, which also is known as ecstasy or molly.” Viral infection could cause both pulmonary and cerebral edema, Lank said. “Trauma would be another potential cause” but would likely cause external marks. “Two people at the same time is odd,” Lank said. “It suggests more of a toxicologic or environmental cause, or a potential infection if they’re traveling together.”

The New York Times 0

WHAT CAUSES FLUID IN THE LUNGS AND BRAIN? A virus? An overdose? Alcohol poisoning? Yes, yes and yes. There’s a long list, said Dr. Patrick Lank, a Northwestern Medicine assistant professor of emergency medicine in Chicago. “One of the more common things we see in the emergency department is related to drug overdose,” Lank said. “Alcohol would be a really common one. Also, cocaine, heroin and other opioids, or MDMA, which also is known as ecstasy or molly.” Viral infection could cause both pulmonary and cerebral edema, Lank said. “Trauma would be another potential cause” but would likely cause external marks. “Two people at the same time is odd,” Lank said. “It suggests more of a toxicologic or environmental cause, or a potential infection if they’re traveling together.”

Associated Press 0

WHAT CAUSES FLUID IN THE LUNGS AND BRAIN? A virus? An overdose? Alcohol poisoning? Yes, yes and yes. There’s a long list, said Dr. Patrick Lank, a Northwestern Medicine assistant professor of emergency medicine in Chicago. “One of the more common things we see in the emergency department is related to drug overdose,” Lank said. “Alcohol would be a really common one. Also, cocaine, heroin and other opioids, or MDMA, which also is known as ecstasy or molly.” Viral infection could cause both pulmonary and cerebral edema, Lank said. “Trauma would be another potential cause” but would likely cause external marks. “Two people at the same time is odd,” Lank said. “It suggests more of a toxicologic or environmental cause, or a potential infection if they’re traveling together.”

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