Media Coverage

The work done by Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine faculty members (and even some students) is regularly highlighted in newspapers, online media outlets and more. Below you’ll find links to articles and videos of Feinberg in the news.

Yahoo! 0

Pills are a bandage, not a cure, says Dr. Phyllis Zee, professor of neurology and sleep medicine at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine. “It’s like taking Tylenol every day for a fever without ever figuring out what’s causing the fever,” Zee says. Depression, too little exercise, runaway stress and a hundred other major or minor health issues could be causing or contributing to your sleeping woes. When you attack your problem with pills, you do nothing to resolve those underlying problems, she explains.

TIME Magazine 0

Pills are a bandage, not a cure, says Dr. Phyllis Zee, professor of neurology and sleep medicine at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine. “It’s like taking Tylenol every day for a fever without ever figuring out what’s causing the fever,” Zee says. Depression, too little exercise, runaway stress and a hundred other major or minor health issues could be causing or contributing to your sleeping woes. When you attack your problem with pills, you do nothing to resolve those underlying problems, she explains.

Yahoo! 0

If stripping down and asking your significant other to examine every inch of your body sounds more anxiety-inducing than romantic, you’re not alone. Many women feel this way, say the authors of a new study on partner skin-cancer screenings. But the benefits of such a practice outweigh the embarrassment, their research suggests. And don’t worry, they say: The awkwardness fades over time.

Yahoo! 0

“We designed these apps so they fit easily into people’s lives and could be used as simply as apps to find a restaurant or directions,” said lead author David Mohr, Professor at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Illinois, US.

Fox News 0

Can spending a few minutes on your smartphone each day improve your mental health? A new study says it’s possible — if you have the right apps. “Using digital tools for mental health is emerging as an important part of our future,” lead study author David Mohr, a professor of preventive medicine at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, said in a statement. The apps “are designed to help the millions of people who want to get [mental health] support but can’t get to a therapist’s office,” Mohr said.

Chicago Tribune 0

A Northwestern Medicine study found a suite of mental health-focused apps, designed at the university’s Feinberg School of Medicine, reduced depression and anxiety symptoms reported by participants by nearly 50 percent over an eight-week period. The study was set to be published Thursday in the Journal of Medical Internet Research.

NPR 0

The American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology video, which features Northwestern University pediatrician Ruchi S. Gupta, recommends adding hot water to 2 teaspoons of peanut butter to make a warm puree. Feed a little bit of the puree to the child, and then monitor for about 10 minutes to make sure there is no reaction such as hives, rash or trouble breathing before continuing to feed the child peanut-containing foods.

Huffington Post 0

What might surprise you: Urinary tract infections become more common in women after menopause because of those estrogen changes, says Lauren Streicher, MD, the director of the Center for Sexual Medicine and Menopause and an associate clinical professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine. (Estrogen appears to play a protective role against the bacteria that lead to UTIs.) “We see this issue in 60 to 70 percent of women after menopause.” What you can do about it: Streicher recommends local estrogen like a topical cream, which delivers lower doses than traditional hormone therapy.

U.S. News & World Report 0

Many people have difficulty getting their lives back on track after being released from juvenile detention, especially those from racial and ethnic minorities, a new study shows. Delinquent youth are at high risk for problems in adulthood. Some of the reasons why include a background of significant trauma and loss, limited social support or adult guidance, and limited academic success, according to study author Karen Abram. She is an associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Northwestern University in Chicago.

HealthDay 0

Many people have difficulty getting their lives back on track after being released from juvenile detention, especially those from racial and ethnic minorities, a new study shows. Delinquent youth are at high risk for problems in adulthood. Some of the reasons why include a background of significant trauma and loss, limited social support or adult guidance, and limited academic success, according to study author Karen Abram. She is an associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Northwestern University in Chicago.

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