Media Coverage

The work done by Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine faculty members (and even some students) is regularly highlighted in newspapers, online media outlets and more. Below you’ll find links to articles and videos of Feinberg in the news.

PRI 0

However, some medical professionals see potential pitfalls in our increasing access to home blood testing. Shannon Haymond, an associate professor of pathology at Northwestern University, points out that we can already go to the store for pregnancy or urine drug tests, for example, and many diabetics are expert at checking their own blood glucose levels. But by and large, she thinks on-demand blood testing can lead us down the wrong road when it comes to keeping tabs on our health.

U.S. News & World Report 0

Why can some people enjoy a cup of coffee just before bed and sleep peacefully, while others lie awake for hours? A new study suggests genes may hold the answer. “Each of us could be potentially responding to caffeine differently, and it’s possible that those differences can extend beyond that of caffeine,” said study author Marilyn Cornelis. She is an assistant professor in the department of preventive medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.

HealthDay 0

Why can some people enjoy a cup of coffee just before bed and sleep peacefully, while others lie awake for hours? A new study suggests genes may hold the answer. “Each of us could be potentially responding to caffeine differently, and it’s possible that those differences can extend beyond that of caffeine,” said study author Marilyn Cornelis. She is an assistant professor in the department of preventive medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.

HealthDay 0

“Some patients have atrial fibrillation 100 percent of the time, while others might have only a few seconds of atrial fibrillation once a year,” explained study author Dr. Steven Swiryn. He’s a clinical professor of cardiology at the Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University in Chicago. “Where atrial fibrillation only happens rarely and lasts a short time, it can be difficult to detect,” Swiryn said.

Chicago Tribune 0

Most people are ill-equipped to recognize the signs or symptoms of mental illness. And the consequences of unidentified mental health problems and inadequate treatment are particularly salient among disadvantaged black people. We must do a better job of addressing and treating mental illness because limited and inaccurate information about mental illness is dangerous.

Yahoo News 0

Plus, research from Northwestern University shows that sleep quality (and duration) is tightly linked with one’s exercise ability. Even when there don’t seem to be enough hours in the day, carve out seven to nine for sleep, and you’ll be better able to deal with stress and stick with your healthy habits.

WBUR-FM (NPR) Boston 0

For patients who need more help losing weight, Dr. Robert Kushner, professor of medicine at Northwestern’s Feinberg School of Medicine, believes physicians should consider weight-loss medications approved in the last five years.

Fox News 0

When kids have food allergies, the children’s parents may think they have food allergies too, but this is often not the case, a new study found. The study was conducted by researchers at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University and the Children’s Hospital of Chicago.

HealthDay 0

One important factor could be whether hospitals are closely following the guidelines for treating a heart attack, said Dr. Donald Lloyd-Jones, chair of preventive medicine for the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago. For example, hospitals should promptly get patients on a multiple-drug regimen that reduces their risk of a second heart attack, and should follow-up regularly with patients to make sure they’re taking their medicine, said Lloyd-Jones, a spokesman for the American Heart Association.

The New York Times 0

Dr. Ron Ackermann, the director of the institute for public health and medicine at Northwestern University, says he remembers his experience rotating through the specialties when he was in medical school. “You’ll be on a team that’s psychiatry, and a month later you’re on general surgery, and the culture is extraordinarily different,” he said. “It’s just sort of a feeling of whether you’re comfortable or not. At the end, most students have a strong feeling of where they want to gravitate.”

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