Media Coverage

The work done by Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine faculty members (and even some students) is regularly highlighted in newspapers, online media outlets and more. Below you’ll find links to articles and videos of Feinberg in the news.

U.S. News & World Report 0

For children troubled by nightmares, comfort from parents is usually all that’s needed to soothe them. “Talk to them, hug them, kiss them – give them a lot of reassurance,” suggests Dr. Marc Weissbluth, a clinical professor emeritus of pediatrics at the Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University in Chicago who has studied sleep issues in children. In addition to nightmares, another common frightful sleep problem some children face is night terrors, which usually begin within a couple hours of a child falling asleep. “It can last five to 15 minutes and the child looks panicky – very frightened,” he notes.

HealthDay 0

In an editorial accompanying the study report, Dr. Robert Bonow and Dr. Clyde Yancy, both from Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, wrote that the findings are significant. Study researchers “provide compelling evidence that statins reduce mortality even when measured at only one year of exposure and that the reduction in mortality is greater with high-intensity statin therapy,” Bonow and Yancy wrote. One caveat, however, is that the findings should be interpreted with caution because they run counter to those from randomized clinical trials, the editorial said.

U.S. News & World Report 0

In an editorial accompanying the study report, Dr. Robert Bonow and Dr. Clyde Yancy, both from Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, wrote that the findings are significant. Study researchers “provide compelling evidence that statins reduce mortality even when measured at only one year of exposure and that the reduction in mortality is greater with high-intensity statin therapy,” Bonow and Yancy wrote. One caveat, however, is that the findings should be interpreted with caution because they run counter to those from randomized clinical trials, the editorial said.

TIME Magazine 0

A hormonal disorder called polycystic ovary syndrome, or PCOS, may affect up to 15% of women, says Dr. Andrea Dunaif, a professor of endocrinology at Northwestern University. “In PCOS, the ovaries are making an excess of male sex hormones,” Dunaif explains. These excess hormones can stimulate oil production, which leads to breakouts, she says. How can you tell the difference between normal breakouts and something like PCOS? Dunaif says the uptick in male sex hormones associated with PCOS often leads to infrequent menstrual periods, usually eight or fewer periods per year. All-the-time acne—not minor breakouts that happen once or twice a month—is another indicator of PCOS, she says.

Yahoo! 0

More than 30 million Americans have eczema, or patches of red, thick, scaly, itchy skin. Older adults are at higher risk for asteatotic eczema, which often causes intense dryness and itchiness on the lower legs. Eczema crops up often in people with asthma or hay fever, but stress, dry heat, allergens, and fragrances and dyes in household products can set it off, too, says Jonathan Silverberg, M.D., director of the Northwestern Medicine Multidisciplinary Center for Eczema at Northwestern University in Chicago.

Business Insider 0

Studies have shown that the drug combination gives a stronger anti-cancer effect than either drug alone, but “we’ve known this is a double-edged sword” because of the risk of over-stimulating the immune system, said Dr. Jeffrey Sosman of Northwestern University in Chicago, who treated the two patients who died. “The big question is, is there enough advantage to using the combination, which is much more toxic, than a single drug,” he said.

CNBC 0

Studies have shown that the drug combination gives a stronger anti-cancer effect than either drug alone, but “we’ve known this is a double-edged sword” because of the risk of over-stimulating the immune system, said Dr. Jeffrey Sosman of Northwestern University in Chicago, who treated the two patients who died. “The big question is, is there enough advantage to using the combination, which is much more toxic, than a single drug,” he said.

ABC News 0

Studies have shown that the drug combination gives a stronger anti-cancer effect than either drug alone, but “we’ve known this is a double-edged sword” because of the risk of over-stimulating the immune system, said Dr. Jeffrey Sosman of Northwestern University in Chicago, who treated the two patients who died. “The big question is, is there enough advantage to using the combination, which is much more toxic, than a single drug,” he said.

The Washington Post 0

Studies have shown that the drug combination gives a stronger anti-cancer effect than either drug alone, but “we’ve known this is a double-edged sword” because of the risk of over-stimulating the immune system, said Dr. Jeffrey Sosman of Northwestern University in Chicago, who treated the two patients who died. “The big question is, is there enough advantage to using the combination, which is much more toxic, than a single drug,” he said.

The Associated Press 0

Studies have shown that the drug combination gives a stronger anti-cancer effect than either drug alone, but “we’ve known this is a double-edged sword” because of the risk of over-stimulating the immune system, said Dr. Jeffrey Sosman of Northwestern University in Chicago, who treated the two patients who died. “The big question is, is there enough advantage to using the combination, which is much more toxic, than a single drug,” he said.

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