Media Coverage

The work done by Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine faculty members (and even some students) is regularly highlighted in newspapers, online media outlets and more. Below you’ll find links to articles and videos of Feinberg in the news.

The Washington Post 0

All can be addressed, doctors say. Perhaps most important is ensuring that older adults remain physically active and don’t become sedentary. “If someone comes into my office walking at a snail’s pace and tells me, ‘I’m old; I’m just slowing down,’ I’m, like, ‘No, that isn’t right,’ ” said Lee Ann Lindquist, a professor of geriatrics at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago. ”You need to start moving around more, get physical therapy or occupational therapy and push yourself to do just a little bit more every day,” she said.

Chicago Tribune 0

All can be addressed, doctors say. Perhaps most important is ensuring that older adults remain physically active and don’t become sedentary. “If someone comes into my office walking at a snail’s pace and tells me, ‘I’m old; I’m just slowing down,’ I’m, like, ‘No, that isn’t right,’ ” said Lee Ann Lindquist, a professor of geriatrics at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago. ”You need to start moving around more, get physical therapy or occupational therapy and push yourself to do just a little bit more every day,” she said.

NPR 0

“It all boils down to a question of tumor biology,” says lead author of that study, Young Kwang Chae, an oncologist and a co-director of the Developmental Therapeutics Program of the Division of Hematology and Oncology at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine. “You can never say one test is the gold standard, or that one is better than the other,” he said. Because they are looking at different samples, it’s not surprising their results vary. Many of the results from these tests are hard to interpret in the first place. In many instances, the presence of a particular mutation doesn’t tell a doctor exactly what form of therapy would work best. But Chae says when he finds an “actionable genetic alteration” from either test, he uses that that to guide a patient’s therapy.

Fox News (National) 0

Melanoma survivors may want to enlist partners to help search their bodies for suspicious looking moles, according to new research. The researchers previously found that skin cancer survivors and their partners could be trained to spot potentially cancerous moles by doing skin exams. The new report shows that during the two years, those same people had increasing confidence in their skills, with no increase in embarrassment or discomfort. “There was concern that they might be embarrassed by examining areas of the body that aren’t normally seen close up,” said lead author Dr. June Robinson, of Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.

Reuters 0

Melanoma survivors may want to enlist partners to help search their bodies for suspicious looking moles, according to new research. The researchers previously found that skin cancer survivors and their partners could be trained to spot potentially cancerous moles by doing skin exams. The new report shows that during the two years, those same people had increasing confidence in their skills, with no increase in embarrassment or discomfort. “There was concern that they might be embarrassed by examining areas of the body that aren’t normally seen close up,” said lead author Dr. June Robinson, of Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.

TODAY 0

The new study “is really eye-opening in terms of the impact of having a stable marriage,” said Dr. Shyam Prabhakaran, a professor of neurology and director of stroke research at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine. It suggests “that the presence of a loved one in your life during those post stroke years provides support and motivation.”

ABC News 0

Other researchers cautioned about reaching any conclusions based on these studies. “We still really don’t know for sure,” says William Muller, a professor of pathology at the Northwestern Feinberg School of Medicine, who wrote an editorial accompanying the CDC study in JAMA. Limitations in both the JAMA and NEJM reports mean they could over- or underestimate the risk, he says.

NPR 0

these studies. “We still really don’t know for sure,” says William Muller, a professor of pathology at the Northwestern Feinberg School of Medicine, who wrote an editorial accompanying the CDC study in JAMA. Limitations in both the JAMA and NEJM reports mean they could over- or underestimate the risk, he says.

HealthDay 0

Embarrassment was especially an issue for women, said the team led by Dr. June Robinson, a professor of dermatology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago. “These aren’t parts of the body that most females like to have examined by their male partner, but at some point, they realized they’re just looking at the moles, not the cellulite,” Robinson said in a university news release.

Chicago Tribune 0

All can be addressed, doctors say. Perhaps most important is ensuring that older adults remain physically active and don’t become sedentary. “If someone comes into my office walking at a snail’s pace and tells me ‘I’m old; I’m just slowing down,’ I’m like no, that isn’t right,” said Dr. Lee Ann Lindquist, a professor of geriatrics at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago. “You need to start moving around more, get physical therapy or occupational therapy and push yourself to do just a little bit more every day.”

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