Media Coverage

The work done by Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine faculty members (and even some students) is regularly highlighted in newspapers, online media outlets and more. Below you’ll find links to articles and videos of Feinberg in the news.

It’s not unusual for anxiety to be expressed physically rather than emotionally—or for us to get so used to feeling anxious that we begin to ignore it and fail to link the physical symptoms with the anxiety. Which can make it difficult for doctors to make the right diagnosis since anxiety can produce a wide variety of symptoms. “That’s the challenge,” says Dr. Michael Ziffra, an anxiety specialist and psychiatrist at Northwestern Memorial Hospital. “You might be more prone to headaches and it’s not unusual for it to cause impairments in cognition, problems with attention, focus and concentration. You might even find your memory is impaired.”

“It is not surprising that providers who are eligible to certify for medical marijuana were more cautious about recommending it, given that their licensure could be jeopardized due to federal prohibition,” study co-author Dr. Kelly Michelson, a critical care physician at Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago, said in a hospital news release. Michelson also directs Northwestern University School of Medicine’s Center for Bioethics and Medical Humanities.

“It is not surprising that providers who are eligible to certify for medical marijuana were more cautious about recommending it, given that their licensure could be jeopardized due to federal prohibition,” study co-author Dr. Kelly Michelson, a critical care physician at Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago, said in a hospital news release. Michelson also directs Northwestern University School of Medicine’s Center for Bioethics and Medical Humanities.

A very recent study led by Northwestern’s Mercedes Carnethon, landed in the same ballpark: a difference of 40 minutes. Carnethon and her colleagues then looked at cardiovascular complications like stroke and hypertension, and found that they could explain “more than one-half of the racial disparities in cardiometabolic risk” as a result of sleep differences. Furthermore, they found an indirect association between race, sex, sleep, and disease risk only among women—a tendency reflected in the general literature. Similarly, another recent study out of Northwestern looked at the correlation between self-reported discrimination and specific indicators of inflammation, and found associations for women but not for men.

“I’m not making the case that everybody should go jumping on the treadmill quickly at a high heart rate,” said Daniel Corcos, co-author of the study and professor of physical therapy and human movement sciences at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. “People have to use common sense. If they have Parkinson’s disease and they are otherwise in good shape, then it’s fine.”

“If you have Parkinson’s disease and you want to delay the progression of your symptoms, you should exercise three times a week with your heart rate between 80 to 85 percent maximum. It is that simple,” said study co-lead author Daniel Corcos. He’s professor of physical therapy and human movement sciences at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.

A team of researchers at Northwestern Medicine and the University of Colorado School of Medicine wanted to find out whether high- or moderate-intensity exercise was safe for patients with Parkinson’s disease. Would it help with the disease’s symptoms, the progressive loss of muscle control, tremors, stiffness?

A team of researchers at Northwestern Medicine and the University of Colorado School of Medicine wanted to find out whether high- or moderate-intensity exercise was safe for patients with Parkinson’s disease. Would it help with the disease’s symptoms, the progressive loss of muscle control, tremors, stiffness? “The real question is: Is there any disease or any disorder for which exercise is not good?” said Daniel Corcos, one of the lead authors of the study and a professor of physical therapy and human movement sciences at Northwestern’s Feinberg School of Medicine. “I haven’t found any.”

Bathing in water is just as effective for the treatment of eczema as bathing in a bleach solution, a new review of previous research indicates. “I don’t know if it throws the baby out with the bathwater, but bleach baths lack the evidence to support how commonly they are being recommended,” said senior author Dr. Jonathan Silverberg. “The water baths appear to be doing most of the heavy lifting. If bleach is adding any benefit, it’s quite modest.”

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