Media Coverage

The work done by Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine faculty members (and even some students) is regularly highlighted in newspapers, online media outlets and more. Below you’ll find links to articles and videos of Feinberg in the news.

I ran the idea of sleep training programs by Phyllis Zee, the medical director of the Center for Circadian and Sleep Medicine at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine.

“It’s a great thing,” she said. “It’s not so much training people to sleep, it’s changing the culture, and that’s important. We have had this culture where we brag about how little sleep we got and how well we can function with so little sleep. It was a badge of honor. It’s slowly shifting.”

“Acne is not about dirt. It’s about inflammation,” Kimball says. So while it’s certainly a good idea to wash your face, “you don’t want to overdo it,” she says. Hard scrubbing with a wash cloth or abrasive cleansers can irritate the skin and make effective treatment more difficult, says Bethanee Schlosser, an assistant professor of dermatology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago. She worked on the treatment guidelines.

As a perinatal psychiatrist, I often hear questions from patients on the safety of medications in pregnancy and breast milk. Of course all women want a healthy pregnancy and the assurance of a healthy baby. If something goes wrong—as it does with three percent of healthy

The movement to improve diversity has landed in medical schools. Some see this as yet another social agenda run amuck. They couldn’t be more wrong. Remaking the physician workforce so it accommodates the increasingly diverse US population is a path towards better health and lower health care costs. Diversity in medicine should matter to everyone.

Kelly Glazer Baron, PhD, a clinical psychologist and sleep researcher at the Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University, examines that same study’s findings and remarks on the participants: “For them, exercise and sleep seem to have a relatively uncomplicated relationship. You work out, fatigue your body and mind, and sleep more soundly that night. But people with insomnia and other sleep disturbances tend to be ‘neurologically different’ … They have what we characterize as a hyper-arousal of the stress system.”

A rheumatologist who was not involved in the study agreed. “At this point, more work is needed, including looking at feasibility and cost issues,” said Dr. Rosalind Ramsey-Goldman, a professor of medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, in Chicago.

A rheumatologist who was not involved in the study agreed. “At this point, more work is needed, including looking at feasibility and cost issues,” said Dr. Rosalind Ramsey-Goldman, a professor of medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, in Chicago.
Ramsey-Goldman also agreed that the findings could eventually lead to new therapies, or point researchers in the direction of existing drugs for other conditions that could be “repurposed” to fight lupus.

Those results are “not good enough,” said American Heart Association past president Dr. Clyde Yancy. “We understand that when we’re measuring blood pressure, the numbers do matter, and we can’t be off by plus or minus 5 or plus or minus 7,” said Yancy, chief of cardiology at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine.

RSS Feed
Get the latest news and event coverage regarding students, faculty, research, and media coverage.

Media Contact
Are you a media outlet looking to engage a Feinberg faculty member?

Share Your News
Do you have news that you would like to share with the Feinberg community?