Media Coverage

The work done by Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine faculty members (and even some students) is regularly highlighted in newspapers, online media outlets and more. Below you’ll find links to articles and videos of Feinberg in the news.

HealthDay 0

Skipping across time zones might be more than just tiring for pro baseball players: The resulting jet lag may actually harm their performance on the field, a new study suggests. The Northwestern University researchers said they found that jet lag slowed the base running of home teams but not away teams. And both home and away pitchers gave up more home runs when jet-lagged

Chicago Tribune 0

The Chicago Cubs weren’t just fighting against 108 years of history on their journey to the World Series win last year. They also apparently were battling jet lag. Traveling even just two or three time zones can cause jet lag that hurts Major League Baseball players’ performance, according to a Northwestern University study set to be released this week.

USA Today 0

The impact “is large enough to essentially negate the home-field advantage,” says study co-author Ravi Allada, a neurobiologist at Northwestern University and a Chicago Cubs fan. He and his colleagues found that jet lag affects both home and away teams, “suggesting it was a real effect, and significant in terms of the size of that effect.”

U.S. News & World Report 0

Researchers say they’ve documented an unseen drag on major league baseball players that can wipe out home field advantage, make pitchers give up more home runs, and take some punch out of a team’s bats. The culprit: jet lag. Dr. Ravi Allada of Northwestern University said he and his colleagues wanted to study the effects of body clock disruptions on human performance. So they chose baseball, a game with plenty of performance measures gathered from hundreds of games a year, played by people who get little chance to settle in to new time zones when they travel.

The Washington Post 0

Researchers say they’ve documented an unseen drag on major league baseball players that can wipe out home field advantage, make pitchers give up more home runs, and take some punch out of a team’s bats. The culprit: jet lag. Dr. Ravi Allada of Northwestern University said he and his colleagues wanted to study the effects of body clock disruptions on human performance. So they chose baseball, a game with plenty of performance measures gathered from hundreds of games a year, played by people who get little chance to settle in to new time zones when they travel.

The New York Times 0

Researchers say they’ve documented an unseen drag on major league baseball players that can wipe out home field advantage, make pitchers give up more home runs, and take some punch out of a team’s bats. The culprit: jet lag. Dr. Ravi Allada of Northwestern University said he and his colleagues wanted to study the effects of body clock disruptions on human performance. So they chose baseball, a game with plenty of performance measures gathered from hundreds of games a year, played by people who get little chance to settle in to new time zones when they travel.

Associated Press 0

Researchers say they’ve documented an unseen drag on major league baseball players that can wipe out home field advantage, make pitchers give up more home runs, and take some punch out of a team’s bats. The culprit: jet lag. Dr. Ravi Allada of Northwestern University said he and his colleagues wanted to study the effects of body clock disruptions on human performance. So they chose baseball, a game with plenty of performance measures gathered from hundreds of games a year, played by people who get little chance to settle in to new time zones when they travel.

PBS 0

So far, scientists can take a piece of ovarian tissue, freeze it and then re-implant it into a patient to produce mature eggs. That process has resulted in at least 100 births so far, mostly by adult patients who were treated for cancer, said Dr. Teresa Woodruff, a reproductive endocrinologist researching the issue at Northwestern’s Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago. Yet this process does not work for all patients, and researchers say that it is unlikely to work for trans people who transition with hormone therapy. So they started to look for ways to grow that tissue in a petri dish, so it can develop into a mature egg. In November, Woodruff co-authored a study in the journal Nature that did just that. “We can continue to develop that technology and eventually, hopefully, this will transfer to all the individuals who are looking for fertility intervention,” Woodruff said.

U.S. News & World Report 0

Despite being a major health threat, obesity isn’t widely discussed in U.S. medical schools, a new study suggests. Obesity is barely mentioned in U.S. medical students’ licensing exams, according to the researchers at Northwestern University School of Medicine in Chicago.

HealthDay 0

Despite being a major health threat, obesity isn’t widely discussed in U.S. medical schools, a new study suggests. Obesity is barely mentioned in U.S. medical students’ licensing exams, according to the researchers at Northwestern University School of Medicine in Chicago.

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