Media Coverage

The work done by Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine faculty members (and even some students) is regularly highlighted in newspapers, online media outlets and more. Below you’ll find links to articles and videos of Feinberg in the news.

Chicago Tribune 0

Lee Lindquist, chief of geriatrics at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine, wondered if people could become better prepared for such emergencies, and so she designed a research project to find out. The result is a unique website, planyourlifespan.org, which helps older adults plan for predictable problems during what Lindquist calls the “last quarter of life” — roughly, from age 75 on. “Many people plan for retirement,” the energetic physician explained in her office close to Lake Michigan. “They complete a will, assign powers of attorney, pick out a funeral home, and they think they’re done.”

Reuters 0

arriers, for example, aren’t a problem when they’re used properly, said Dr. Elizabeth Powell, a pediatrics researcher at Northwestern University in Chicago who wasn’t involved in the study. “As an ED clinician, I see infants who are not properly restrained, or those who fall from carriers placed on counters, beds or other furniture,” Powell said by email. “While this detail is outside the scope of the report, this is why there are injuries associated with this product.”

The New York Times 0

The results suggest that an integrated approach to healthy eating is possible, said Linda Van Horn, a spokeswoman for the American Heart Association and a professor of preventive medicine at Northwestern University, who was not involved in the study. “Typically, the higher the diet is in natural — not processed — plant-based foods, the lower the sodium intake is,” she said. “So by eating more of the favored foods, the detrimental intakes of sodium, as well as trans-fat and saturated fat and sugar, are lower.”

Chicago Tribune 0

Critics of the shorter limit said it short-changed rookie doctors. Dr. Karl Bilimoria, a Northwestern University surgery professor, said some residents have complained that they’ve had to leave work in the middle of surgeries. Bilimoria led a study published last year suggesting that first-year residents could work longer without endangering patient safety or their own well-being.

ABC News 0

Critics of the shorter limit said it short-changed rookie doctors. Dr. Karl Bilimoria, a Northwestern University surgery professor, said some residents have complained that they’ve had to leave work in the middle of surgeries. Bilimoria led a study published last year suggesting that first-year residents could work longer without endangering patient safety or their own well-being.

The Washington Post 0

Critics of the shorter limit said it short-changed rookie doctors. Dr. Karl Bilimoria, a Northwestern University surgery professor, said some residents have complained that they’ve had to leave work in the middle of surgeries. Bilimoria led a study published last year suggesting that first-year residents could work longer without endangering patient safety or their own well-being.

The New York Times 0

Critics of the shorter limit said it short-changed rookie doctors. Dr. Karl Bilimoria, a Northwestern University surgery professor, said some residents have complained that they’ve had to leave work in the middle of surgeries. Bilimoria led a study published last year suggesting that first-year residents could work longer without endangering patient safety or their own well-being.

Associated Press 0

Critics of the shorter limit said it short-changed rookie doctors. Dr. Karl Bilimoria, a Northwestern University surgery professor, said some residents have complained that they’ve had to leave work in the middle of surgeries. Bilimoria led a study published last year suggesting that first-year residents could work longer without endangering patient safety or their own well-being.

The New York Times 0

“These tests have an impact, and now there’s more of a scientific rationale for their use,” said Dr. Emily S. Miller, an assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Northwestern University who was not involved with the study. She predicted that this critical new data would not only persuade more obstetrician-gynecologists that placental testing “is something we really need to recommend,” but also help convince bereaved parents that follow-up testing is “worthwhile.” Despite the tests, some stillbirths remain unexplained. “It’s frustrating,” Dr. Miller said. But, she added: “Feeling like we are doing everything we can to understand why can bring emotional closure.”

U.S. News & World Report 0

Overweight and obese people tend to develop heart disease at an earlier age, living with chronic illness for much longer than those of a healthy weight, a new study shows. These findings show that even though some may benefit from an “obesity paradox” — where people with excess weight live longer than those of normal weight — those extra years of life could be filled with illness and misery, said lead researcher Dr. Sadiya Khan, an instructor at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago. “Individuals in the overweight category really live about the same amount of time,” Khan said. “It was really the difference about how long they lived with cardiovascular disease because they developed the disease earlier in life.”

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