Media Coverage

The work done by Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine faculty members (and even some students) is regularly highlighted in newspapers, online media outlets and more. Below you’ll find links to articles and videos of Feinberg in the news.

Huffington Post 0

Colorado theater shooter James Holmes’ IQ score dropped dramatically over two years he was in jail, possibly because of mental illness. Dr. Robert Hanlon, a medical expert from Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine, testified Thursday that Holmes had an above average IQ of 123 when he first examined him in April 2013, nearly a year after he killed 12 people and wounded 70 during a packed movie premiere. But that number fell to 116 by the time Hanlon examined Holmes again in January 2015.

CBS News 0

Colorado theater shooter James Holmes’ IQ score dropped dramatically over two years he was in jail, possibly because of mental illness. Dr. Robert Hanlon, a medical expert from Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine, testified Thursday that Holmes had an above average IQ of 123 when he first examined him in April 2013, nearly a year after he killed 12 people and wounded 70 during a packed movie premiere. But that number fell to 116 by the time Hanlon examined Holmes again in January 2015.

Associated Press 0

Colorado theater shooter James Holmes’ IQ score dropped dramatically over two years he was in jail, possibly because of mental illness. Dr. Robert Hanlon, a medical expert from Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine, testified Thursday that Holmes had an above average IQ of 123 when he first examined him in April 2013, nearly a year after he killed 12 people and wounded 70 during a packed movie premiere. But that number fell to 116 by the time Hanlon examined Holmes again in January 2015.

Fox News 0

Swear you’ll only have a few sips? Everyone does. But people tend to drink more than they planned on days that they exercise more than usual, found research by David E. Conroy, PhD, a professor in Preventive Medicine-Behavioral Medicine at Northwestern University.

The Washington Post 0

Without two genetic mutations, the Black Death would never have been more than a minor gastrointestinal annoyance. In the new study lead by microbiologist Wyndham Lathem, researchers from the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine found that a single gene for producing the protein Pla (acquired by Y. pestis early in its evolution) allowed the bacterium to infect the lungs. Until then, based on tests of bacteria altered to lack the gene, it may have been able to colonize the lungs, but wouldn’t have caused a serious infection there.

Fox News (National) 0

The Justinian Plague is estimated to have killed 25 million to 50 million people and the Black Death at least 150 million people, said microbiologist Wyndham Lathem of Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago, who led the study published in the journal Nature Communications.

Reuters 0

The bacterium Yersinia pestis has inflicted almost unimaginable misery upon humankind over the centuries, killing an estimated 200 million or more people and triggering horrific plagues in the 6th and 14th centuries. But this germ was not always particularly dangerous. Scientists said on Tuesday minor genetic changes that it underwent many centuries ago – adding a single gene that subsequently mutated – turned it from mild to murderous. They also found that a single mutation of the same gene – a mutation present in modern strains of the bacterium – enabled it to spread in the body and invade the lymph nodes as occurs in bubonic plague. The Justinian Plague is estimated to have killed 25 million to 50 million people and the Black Death at least 150 million people, said microbiologist Wyndham Lathem of Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago, who led the study published in the journal Nature Communications. “It’s just remarkable what Yersinia pestis has done to the course of human civilization,” Lathem said.

Chicago Tribune 0

Job interviews can be daunting challenges for veterans suffering from post traumatic stress disorder. Even a closed office door can be a trigger. But research at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine, published Wednesday in the journal Psychiatric Services, found that a virtual-reality interview simulator significantly increases a military veteran’s chances of landing a job. “Job Interview Training with Molly Porter” refers to a computer program that stars an actress who reads carefully crafted questions and responses. Developed by Baltimore-based startup SIMmersion, it has been available for general use since last summer.

Chicago Sun-Times 0

Bringing together scientists from the University of Chicago, Northwestern University and Duke University, the new March of Dimes Prematurity Research Center at U. of C. will aim to identify gene functions responsible for ensuring that a pregnancy continues to full term. The researchers also will study how prolonged stress affects those functions.

Chicago Tribune 0

The rate of emergency room visits and hospitalizations of children with severe food allergy reactions nearly tripled in Illinois over five years, reports a new study released Friday by Northwestern Medicine. “This study is really important because it shows the impact food allergies are having — especially in Illinois,” said lead study author Dr. Ruchi Gupta, a professor of pediatrics at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and a physician at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago. “The big question is why … and that’s what we are working on to find out. We know that food allergies are tied to both genetics and the environment — and we know that something has changed for it to have gone up so drastically,” she said.

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