Media Coverage

The work done by Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine faculty members (and even some students) is regularly highlighted in newspapers, online media outlets and more. Below you’ll find links to articles and videos of Feinberg in the news.

Crain's Chicago Business 0

Northwestern Medicine has transformed its once-sleepy heart program into a powerhouse that has treated a who’s who of Chicago’s business elite, from real estate and casino mogul Neil Bluhm to United Airlines CEO Oscar Munoz.

Reuters 0

“Even dermatologists can miss the nuances of what exactly SPF or sun protection factor really means from the physics standpoint,” said Dr. Steve Xu, a dermatologist at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago who wasn’t involved in the study. “For consumers, it’s important to know that SPF is a laboratory measure of a sunscreen’s strength,” Xu said, adding that there are several things a consumer should consider when picking a sunscreen product.

Crain's Chicago Business 0

“There’s no doubt that alternative forms of pain management are essential to reducing opioid abuse,” says Juliet Sorensen, a professor of law at Northwestern University who organized a recent symposium in Chicago on the epidemic. “But they take more time, more effort and more resources than popping a pill, which is how we got ourselves into this problem in the first place.”

National Geographic 0

Neuroscientist Nina Kraus of Northwestern University in Chicago found still more positive effects on older adults of early musical training—this time, in the realm of hearing and communication. She measured the electrical activity in the auditory brainstems of 44 adults, ages 55 to 76, as they responded to the synthesised speech syllable “da.” Although none of the subjects had played a musical instrument in 40 years, those who had trained the longest—between four and fourteen years— responded the fastest.

U.S. News and World Report 0

College students seem to take longer to recover from concussion than the average in the United States, a new study suggests. Researchers reviewed the medical charts of 128 students who suffered a concussion during the 2014-2015 academic year at Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill. Their average age was 20. “Recovering from a concussion requires active rest and refraining from excessive physical and cognitive stimuli, such as contact sports, reading, writing and even the need for limitation of watching television and online activities,” lead investigator Dr. Prakash Jayabalan, said in an association news release. Jayabalan is an attending physician at the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, and an assistant professor at Northwestern’s Feinberg School of Medicine.

HealthDay 0

College students seem to take longer to recover from concussion than the average in the United States, a new study suggests. Researchers reviewed the medical charts of 128 students who suffered a concussion during the 2014-2015 academic year at Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill. Their average age was 20. “Recovering from a concussion requires active rest and refraining from excessive physical and cognitive stimuli, such as contact sports, reading, writing and even the need for limitation of watching television and online activities,” lead investigator Dr. Prakash Jayabalan, said in an association news release. Jayabalan is an attending physician at the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, and an assistant professor at Northwestern’s Feinberg School of Medicine.

TODAY 0

Laura Streicher, clinical associate professor of obstetric and gynecology at Feinberg, says about 36 percent of people report having low libido. Contrary to popular belief, the phenomenon is caused by brain activity, not a hormone imbalance.

Crain's Chicago Business 0

Craig Garfield, a neonatal hospitalist at Northwestern’s Prentice Women’s Hospital and an attending physician at Lurie Children’s Hospital, is developing an app that directly connects new parents to real-time information about their babies in intensive care. It’s the first app of its kind, according to Garfield. He’s working on it with Young Seok Lee, an adjunct professor at Northwestern’s Feinberg School of Medicine who has a Ph.D. in industrial engineering.

The Washington Post 0

Both the biological clock and the enormous demands of their careers may drive women to leave jobs in medicine to find work-life balance. Taking the biological clock partly out of the equation with egg freezing may help chill the burnout trend, allowing more women to stay in the medical field and continue practicing what they trained so hard to do.

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