Media Coverage

The work done by Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine faculty members (and even some students) is regularly highlighted in newspapers, online media outlets and more. Below you’ll find links to articles and videos of Feinberg in the news.

The Daily Beast 0

In a paper published in Molecular Psychiatry in August, scientists say they’ve discovered biomarkers in the blood that, when combined with results of a mental health questionnaire, can predict with 92 percent accuracy whether someone has high suicide risk, or ideation (having thoughts about how to kill yourself). “If people without prior illness would take these tests, the results would need to be treated with the same caution as when genetic testing implies that someone has predisposition to a physical illness, be it prostate cancer or Alzheimer’s disease,” says Eva E Redei, MS, Ph.D., professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Asher Center for the Study and Treatment of Depressive Disorders in the Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University.

Windy City Times 0

Although younger men who have sex with men ( MSM ) are often at the highest risk of HIV infection, only 30 percent of the respondents in a new study from local researchers had ever been tested. The greatest barriers to their being tested, according to research conducted by the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and the San Clemente, California-based Center for Innovative Public Health Research ( CIPHR ), are not knowing where to go to get an HIV test, fear of being recognized at the testing site and thinking that oneself is not at risk for infection.

Chicago Tribune 0

A center hosted at the University of Wisconsin-Madison is getting $20 million in National Science Foundation funding as it studies the effects of nanotechnology on the environment. Other partners in the center include the University of Minnesota, the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and Northwestern University.

U.S. News & World Report 0

The weight gain for new fathers is over and above the added heft shown to be associated with men tying the knot, and independent of other factors that can affect what the scale says, such as aging or socioeconomic status, according to the study’s lead author Dr. Craig Garfield, an associate professor of pediatrics and of medical social sciences at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.

Chicago Tribune 0

Investigators from Northwestern and the University of Chicago received a $6.25 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to fund research to end “the HIV epidemic in Chicago among young men who have sex with men.”

New York Daily News 0

Only about one in five teenage gay and bisexual males in a new study said they’d ever been tested for HIV, despite their increased risk of infection. And almost half the teens didn’t know where they could go to be tested for HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, researchers found. “It’s important for all teens to get tested if they’re sexually active, but it’s especially important for young gay and bisexual men to be tested because they’re at such an increased risk of transmission,” said lead author Brian Mustanski, of Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.

Washington Post 0

Men who murder their wives or girlfriends are a distinctly different group than those who kill strangers, according to a new study by a forensic psychology research lab at Northwestern University. Chief among those differences: they are less likely to have a rap sheet for serious crimes.

Huffington Post 0

The word “Oncofertility” was coined by Dr. Teresa K. Woodruff of Northwestern University to define an area of academic research and practice that concerns both oncology and reproductive medicine. Oncofertility researchers and practitioners study fertility preservation options and are innovating new ways to help people who face impaired or reduced fertility rates due to cancer.

Yahoo! News 0

So report Northwestern University researchers in the Journal of Forensic Sciences after interviewing and evaluating 153 murderers for more than 1,500 hours. Domestic homicide is one of the most common types of murder in the US, with one-third of all murdered American women killed at the hands of their male partners, current or former.

Fox News 0

“It’s important for all teens to get tested if they’re sexually active, but it’s especially important for young gay and bisexual men to be tested because they’re at such an increased risk of transmission,” said lead author Brian Mustanski, of Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.

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