Media Coverage

The work done by Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine faculty members (and even some students) is regularly highlighted in newspapers, online media outlets and more. Below you’ll find links to articles and videos of Feinberg in the news.

CNN 0

In the spring and summer of 2015, the state switched more than 13,000 children out of a highly respected program called Children’s Medical Services, or CMS, a part of Florida Medicaid. Children on this plan have serious health problems including birth defects, heart disease, diabetes and blindness. The state moved the children to other Medicaid insurance plans that don’t specialize in caring for very sick children…”These are the sickest and most vulnerable kids, and (changing their insurance) can mean life or death for them,” said Joan Alker, executive director of the Center for Children and Families at Georgetown University. “This is really very troubling.”..
Dr. Rishi Agrawal, an associate professor of pediatrics at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine, agreed, adding that Florida should have more carefully considered how the insurance switch would affect the children’s health care.
“The process in Florida was particularly abrupt and poorly executed,” he said.

Science Daily 0

Northwestern Medicine scientists have developed a novel method of tracking HIV infection, allowing the behavior of individual virions — infectious particles — to be connected to infectivity…”This approach — and the ability to say ‘that virion infected that cell’ — will help bring clarity to the field,” said principal investigator Thomas Hope, a professor of cell and molecular biology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine.

Crain's Chicago Business 0

For now, hospitals, which charge an average $2,600 for an MRI, seem sanguine about this new competition. But they shouldn’t be, says Dr. Joel Shalowitz, a professor at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine who also teaches at the Kellogg School of Management. “If they’re not running at reasonable capacity, it’s a huge threat,” he says.

SELF 0

If you’re taking a hormonal birth control pill and using it as directed, you’re not ovulating, Lauren Streicher, M.D., an associate professor of clinical obstetrics and gynecology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, tells SELF. “The hormones in the pill, particularly progesterone, are tricking your body into thinking you’re pregnant,” she explains.

TODAY 0

Addiction specialist Dr. Suena Massey agreed that this study should not prompt abstainers to start drinking for their health. According to Massey, an associate professor in the department of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine, it wouldn’t be worth the risk of “rolling the dice,” based on a study that finds an association, as opposed to proof, of alcohol’s health benefits.

The Washington Post 0

When Teresa Woodruff was in kindergarten, she tried dissecting earthworms to figure out how they work. Now, the 3-D-printed ovaries produced in her lab at Northwestern University are helping scientists better understand the female reproductive system — and that understanding has opened the door to promising new fertility treatments. Woodruff is the guest on the latest episode of People Behind the Science, a podcast that asks scientists about their motivations, challenges and accomplishments.

U.S. News & World Report 0

Steady daytime levels of the stress hormone cortisol are associated with serious health problems, such as inflammation, obesity and cancer, researchers say. Normally, cortisol levels should vary throughout the day. “Cortisol is naturally high in the morning to help perk you up, and it decreases into the evening,” said study lead author Emma Adam . She is a professor of human development and social policy at Northwestern University.

HealthDay 0

Steady daytime levels of the stress hormone cortisol are associated with serious health problems, such as inflammation, obesity and cancer, researchers say. Normally, cortisol levels should vary throughout the day. “Cortisol is naturally high in the morning to help perk you up, and it decreases into the evening,” said study lead author Emma Adam . She is a professor of human development and social policy at Northwestern University.

TIME Magazine 0

In August, the Home Centered Care Institute announced that it is launching an education program to train 5,000 new doctors how to care for elderly people in their homes. Training programs include prominent hospitals like the Cleveland Clinic and Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine.

The New York Times 0

I teach my students to depict the specifics of every inch of the fetal bodies, until the drawings become profound examinations of bodies stopped in time. Their final assignment is to research a contemporary person with the same condition as their chosen fetus and do a presentation on his or her life. It helps these future doctors to stop seeing the specimens as historic artifacts or tragic medical problems. It’s as if we’re back at the Mutter, but this time those fetuses are given possible present lives, going forward in time.

1 2 3 443