Media Coverage

The work done by Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine faculty members (and even some students) is regularly highlighted in newspapers, online media outlets and more. Below you’ll find links to articles and videos of Feinberg in the news.

Business Insider 0

Scientists in the United States have successfully treated broken spines and skulls in animals using 3D-printed synthetic bone, opening the possibility of future personalized bone implants for humans to fix dental, spinal other bone injuries. “Another unique property … is that it’s highly porous and absorbent – and this is important for cell and tissue integration,” said Ramille Shah of Northwestern University’s department of material science, engineering and surgery, who co-led the work. With this hyper-elastic bone, however, many of those issues would be overcome, said Adam Jakus, Shah’s co-researcher at Northwestern University. “It’s purely synthetic, very cheap and very easy to make,” he said. “It can be packaged, shipped and stored very nicely.”

Fox News (National) 0

Scientists in the United States have successfully treated broken spines and skulls in animals using 3D-printed synthetic bone, opening the possibility of future personalized bone implants for humans to fix dental, spinal other bone injuries. “Another unique property … is that it’s highly porous and absorbent – and this is important for cell and tissue integration,” said Ramille Shah of Northwestern University’s department of material science, engineering and surgery, who co-led the work. With this hyper-elastic bone, however, many of those issues would be overcome, said Adam Jakus, Shah’s co-researcher at Northwestern University. “It’s purely synthetic, very cheap and very easy to make,” he said. “It can be packaged, shipped and stored very nicely.”

Reuters 0

Scientists in the United States have successfully treated broken spines and skulls in animals using 3D-printed synthetic bone, opening the possibility of future personalized bone implants for humans to fix dental, spinal other bone injuries. “Another unique property … is that it’s highly porous and absorbent – and this is important for cell and tissue integration,” said Ramille Shah of Northwestern University’s department of material science, engineering and surgery, who co-led the work. With this hyper-elastic bone, however, many of those issues would be overcome, said Adam Jakus, Shah’s co-researcher at Northwestern University. “It’s purely synthetic, very cheap and very easy to make,” he said. “It can be packaged, shipped and stored very nicely.”

NPR 0

“The greater cause of the stagnation in cardiovascular death rates is that the obesity epidemic, which started in this country in about 1985, is finally coming home to roost,” says Donald Lloyd-Jones, a physician and chair of the department of preventive medicine at Northwestern University.

Chicago Tribune 0

“We don’t know definitively whether the reproductive system is influencing cardiovascular health or cardiovascular disease is influencing the ovary,” said Teresa Woodruff, one of the editorial writers. She is vice chair for research in obstetrics and gynecology at Northwestern University in Chicago.

HealthDay 0

“We don’t know definitively whether the reproductive system is influencing cardiovascular health or cardiovascular disease is influencing the ovary,” said Teresa Woodruff, one of the editorial writers. She is vice chair for research in obstetrics and gynecology at Northwestern University in Chicago.

Yahoo! 0

Women in Western populations enter menopause at an average age of 51, write Dr. JoAnn Manson, of Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, and Teresa Woodruff, of Northwestern University in Chicago, in an editorial accompanying the new analysis.

Professional societies agree that women with early menopause should be considered for hormone therapy – if eligible – to manage symptoms and protect bone and vascular health, Manson and Woodruff write.

Fox News 0

Women in Western populations enter menopause at an average age of 51, write Dr. JoAnn Manson, of Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, and Teresa Woodruff, of Northwestern University in Chicago, in an editorial accompanying the new analysis.

Professional societies agree that women with early menopause should be considered for hormone therapy – if eligible – to manage symptoms and protect bone and vascular health, Manson and Woodruff write.

Reuters 0

Women who enter menopause before age 45 are more likely to have cardiovascular problems and to die younger than women who enter menopause later in life, according to a new analysis. Women in Western populations enter menopause at an average age of 51, write Dr. JoAnn Manson, of Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, and Teresa Woodruff, of Northwestern University in Chicago, in an editorial accompanying the new analysis. Professional societies agree that women with early menopause should be considered for hormone therapy – if eligible – to manage symptoms and protect bone and vascular health, Manson and Woodruff write.

Fox News (National) 0

“When we talk about pneumonia, we don’t necessarily talk about whether it’s communicable or not unless it’s one of the diseases of great public interest, such as influenza, Legionnaire’s disease, and tuberculosis,” Dr. Richard Wunderink, professor of pulmonary and critical care at Northwestern Medicine, told FoxNews.com. “It’s very important to report tuberculosis, but we don’t even report if you have, say, pneumococcal pneumonia, the most common bacterial pneumonia, or mycoplasma pneumonia, another common bacterial pneumonia.”

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