Media Coverage

The work done by Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine faculty members (and even some students) is regularly highlighted in newspapers, online media outlets and more. Below you’ll find links to articles and videos of Feinberg in the news.

Huffington Post 0

President Trump and distinguished members of Congress: My colleagues, patients and I are ready, willing and able to help you craft a new health care bill. Please reach across the aisles and include us. Together we can find a better way.
Written by Dr. Melissa Simon

HealthDay 0

Muscle aches and pains are the most common side effect associated with statins, with about 20 percent of patients reporting these symptoms, said said Dr. Donald Lloyd-Jones. He’s a professor of preventive medicine and cardiology at the Northwestern University School of Medicine in Chicago. “They have the muscle aches anyway,” Lloyd-Jones said. “If you think about it, in general people who are getting statins are a little bit older, and we’re advising to stay physically active for their heart health. They’re going to have some muscle aches.” Lloyd-Jones said statins can increase blood sugar levels, creating a 10 percent to 20 percent increased risk of developing diabetes. “However, and this is a big however, people with normal blood sugar and people who are not significantly obese do not develop diabetes from being put on a statin,” Lloyd-Jones said. “It’s only people who are already at high risk for developing diabetes who get a little bump in their blood sugar from a statin that pushes them over the threshold of diagnosis.”

The Washington Post 0

“It’s a fascinating report — one of those things that comes out of the blue,” said Dr. June Robinson , a Northwestern University research professor in dermatology. Robinson is also editor of the medical journal JAMA Dermatology, which published the study online this month. She said the results deserve a deeper look but cautioned that it’s way too soon to suggest that they might lead to new treatments for gray hair.

The New York Times 0

“It’s a fascinating report — one of those things that comes out of the blue,” said Dr. June Robinson , a Northwestern University research professor in dermatology. Robinson is also editor of the medical journal JAMA Dermatology, which published the study online this month. She said the results deserve a deeper look but cautioned that it’s way too soon to suggest that they might lead to new treatments for gray hair.

Associated Press 0

“It’s a fascinating report — one of those things that comes out of the blue,” said Dr. June Robinson , a Northwestern University research professor in dermatology. Robinson is also editor of the medical journal JAMA Dermatology, which published the study online this month. She said the results deserve a deeper look but cautioned that it’s way too soon to suggest that they might lead to new treatments for gray hair.

The New York Times 0

But the sensor cannot accomplish these tasks alone. “It’s not a full integrated electronic system,” said John A. Rogers , a professor of materials science and engineering at Northwestern University, who was not involved in the study. It needs to be combined with a power source and devices to read and transfer the data. “It’s a component of a broader system that could have utility.”

U.S. News & World Report 0

“That (recovery) usually takes about 10 to 14 days before starting therapy,” said Dr. Maciej Lesniak, chair of neurological surgery at Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago. The treatment is usually very well tolerated, Lesniak said. “Generally, people can maintain normal quality of life during therapy including their work in the majority of cases.”

Reuters 0

“That (recovery) usually takes about 10 to 14 days before starting therapy,” said Dr. Maciej Lesniak, chair of neurological surgery at Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago. The treatment is usually very well tolerated, Lesniak said. “Generally, people can maintain normal quality of life during therapy including their work in the majority of cases.”

Reuters 0

“That (recovery) usually takes about 10 to 14 days before starting therapy,” said Dr. Maciej Lesniak, chair of neurological surgery at Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago. The treatment is usually very well tolerated, Lesniak said. “Generally, people can maintain normal quality of life during therapy including their work in the majority of cases.”

Reuters 0

Even though some in the medical community have expressed concerns that efforts to lower readmissions might give doctors an incentive to inappropriately keep patients out of the hospital who need to return for additional care, the study offers fresh evidence that this doesn’t happen, said Dr. Karl Bilimoria , director of the Surgical Outcomes and Quality Improvement Center at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago. “While some may suggest this, most of us have not given this argument credence – doctors will still do the right thing and readmit patients when it is medically needed,” Bilimoria, who wasn’t involved in the study, said by email.

1 82 83 84 85 86 129