Media Coverage

The work done by Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine faculty members (and even some students) is regularly highlighted in newspapers, online media outlets and more. Below you’ll find links to articles and videos of Feinberg in the news.

Today 0

Dr. Whitney You suspects that there may be some hidden biases in the data due to the fact that women who opt to delay pregnancy often have a higher educational level and socio-economic status, compared to women who don’t.

“They did ‘correct’ for this, but you can only correct so much,” said You, an assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine. “We don’t know whether that is driving this result or whether it’s truly physiologic.”

Chicago Tribune 0

No one tracks how many gay men are having babies via surrogates, but observers say that the numbers are growing. “I’ve definitely seen an increase,” says Dr. Eve Feinberg, an assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine. “As gay marriage has become legal, I think it’s become much more socially acceptable for men to pursue fertility treatments and have babies.”

Yahoo! 0

A new type of acoustic sensor that resembles a small Band-Aid on the skin can monitor your heartbeat and other health measures, researchers say. The sensor may one day offer a way to painlessly and wirelessly track an individual’s health. The patch, which weighs less than one-hundredth of an ounce, can help doctors monitor heart health, stomach condition, vocal cord activity, lung performance and potentially many other bodily functions, researchers say. “We’ve developed a soft, skin-like device that can listen to internal sounds created by function of internal organs,” explained study co-author John Rogers. He was a professor of materials science and engineering and a professor of chemistry at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign during the study and is currently at Northwestern University.

HealthDay 0

A new type of acoustic sensor that resembles a small Band-Aid on the skin can monitor your heartbeat and other health measures, researchers say. The sensor may one day offer a way to painlessly and wirelessly track an individual’s health. The patch, which weighs less than one-hundredth of an ounce, can help doctors monitor heart health, stomach condition, vocal cord activity, lung performance and potentially many other bodily functions, researchers say. “We’ve developed a soft, skin-like device that can listen to internal sounds created by function of internal organs,” explained study co-author John Rogers. He was a professor of materials science and engineering and a professor of chemistry at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign during the study and is currently at Northwestern University.

U.S. News & World Report 0

A new type of acoustic sensor that resembles a small Band-Aid on the skin can monitor your heartbeat and other health measures, researchers say. The sensor may one day offer a way to painlessly and wirelessly track an individual’s health. The patch, which weighs less than one-hundredth of an ounce, can help doctors monitor heart health, stomach condition, vocal cord activity, lung performance and potentially many other bodily functions, researchers say. “We’ve developed a soft, skin-like device that can listen to internal sounds created by function of internal organs,” explained study co-author John Rogers. He was a professor of materials science and engineering and a professor of chemistry at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign during the study and is currently at Northwestern University.

Becker's Hospital Review 0

The first student has graduated from Northwestern Medicine’s PhD in healthcare quality and patient safety program — the first such program in the nation. The Chicago-based program uses industry “outsiders” like engineers, cognitive psychologists and risk assessment and change management specialists to train clinicians to locate gaps in the system and fix them.

Chicago Tribune 0

About half of the time, parents use pet words for the anatomy when they take their children to his office, said Dr. Scott Goldstein, a pediatrician with Northwestern Children’s Practice and instructor at the Feinberg School of Medicine. But Goldstein said he’d prefer that parents use the proper terminology. “It is important to teach children the name of their body parts, so that they are comfortable understanding and communicating about their bodies,” Goldstein said. “Just like it would be odd to teach a child to call their eye a ‘see see’ or their hand a ‘touchy touchy,’ it can be infantilizing and discomforting to encourage them to use euphemisms or unique words to discuss their genitals.”

Huffington Post 0

“It appears that some elderly individuals are immune to the effects of Alzheimer’s pathology,” said neurologist Changiz Geula, of Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, who presented the findings Tuesday at the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience in San Diego.

NPR 0

Still, under no circumstance should parents feed their babies whole peanuts, which is a clear choking hazard, cautions Dr. Ruchi S. Gupta, a pediatrician and immunologist at Northwestern University, in an ACAAI video aimed at parents. Even peanut butter can be risky at that age, Gupta explains, because it’s thick and sticky.

Health Day 0

Most colleges don’t have comprehensive programs to support students with food allergies, putting them at risk for life-threatening allergic reactions, according to a new study. “Our study found that while many colleges offer support for students with food allergy in the dining hall, the same support doesn’t carry over to organized sports, dormitories or social events” said lead author Dr. Ruchi Gupta, an associate professor of pediatrics at Northwestern University.

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