Media Coverage

The work done by Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine faculty members (and even some students) is regularly highlighted in newspapers, online media outlets and more. Below you’ll find links to articles and videos of Feinberg in the news.

U.S. News and World Report 0

Dr. Joel Shalowitz, professor of preventive medicine at the Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University, says understanding how another nation’s health system works enriches your outlook on your own country’s health care system by allowing you to compare and contrast the two.

ABC News 0

Dr. Mamta Swaroop, 39, a trauma surgeon at Northwestern Memorial Hospital, created the Chicago South Side Trauma First Responders Course and wants to give all trainees basic knowledge of what to do in a situation like the one Jacobs faced so that they don’t have to rely on vaguely remembered movie scenes for medical guidance. Swaroop came up with the idea for the course after having multiple patients bleed out to death before they could be saved at the hospital. She noticed many had wounds in their arms and legs that, if properly bandaged, may have been survivable.

Reuters 0

Similarly, a second study published in the same journal found factors that put people at risk for HIV and AIDS were more common among adults who spent time in the juvenile justice system than the general population. Like the general population, Karen Abram and colleagues at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago write that the prevalence of those risk factors declined over time.

HealthDay 0

Skipping across time zones might be more than just tiring for pro baseball players: The resulting jet lag may actually harm their performance on the field, a new study suggests. The Northwestern University researchers said they found that jet lag slowed the base running of home teams but not away teams. And both home and away pitchers gave up more home runs when jet-lagged

Chicago Tribune 0

The Chicago Cubs weren’t just fighting against 108 years of history on their journey to the World Series win last year. They also apparently were battling jet lag. Traveling even just two or three time zones can cause jet lag that hurts Major League Baseball players’ performance, according to a Northwestern University study set to be released this week.

USA Today 0

The impact “is large enough to essentially negate the home-field advantage,” says study co-author Ravi Allada, a neurobiologist at Northwestern University and a Chicago Cubs fan. He and his colleagues found that jet lag affects both home and away teams, “suggesting it was a real effect, and significant in terms of the size of that effect.”

U.S. News & World Report 0

Researchers say they’ve documented an unseen drag on major league baseball players that can wipe out home field advantage, make pitchers give up more home runs, and take some punch out of a team’s bats. The culprit: jet lag. Dr. Ravi Allada of Northwestern University said he and his colleagues wanted to study the effects of body clock disruptions on human performance. So they chose baseball, a game with plenty of performance measures gathered from hundreds of games a year, played by people who get little chance to settle in to new time zones when they travel.

The Washington Post 0

Researchers say they’ve documented an unseen drag on major league baseball players that can wipe out home field advantage, make pitchers give up more home runs, and take some punch out of a team’s bats. The culprit: jet lag. Dr. Ravi Allada of Northwestern University said he and his colleagues wanted to study the effects of body clock disruptions on human performance. So they chose baseball, a game with plenty of performance measures gathered from hundreds of games a year, played by people who get little chance to settle in to new time zones when they travel.

The New York Times 0

Researchers say they’ve documented an unseen drag on major league baseball players that can wipe out home field advantage, make pitchers give up more home runs, and take some punch out of a team’s bats. The culprit: jet lag. Dr. Ravi Allada of Northwestern University said he and his colleagues wanted to study the effects of body clock disruptions on human performance. So they chose baseball, a game with plenty of performance measures gathered from hundreds of games a year, played by people who get little chance to settle in to new time zones when they travel.

Associated Press 0

Researchers say they’ve documented an unseen drag on major league baseball players that can wipe out home field advantage, make pitchers give up more home runs, and take some punch out of a team’s bats. The culprit: jet lag. Dr. Ravi Allada of Northwestern University said he and his colleagues wanted to study the effects of body clock disruptions on human performance. So they chose baseball, a game with plenty of performance measures gathered from hundreds of games a year, played by people who get little chance to settle in to new time zones when they travel.

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