Media Coverage

The work done by Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine faculty members (and even some students) is regularly highlighted in newspapers, online media outlets and more. Below you’ll find links to articles and videos of Feinberg in the news.

Fox News (National) 0

In recent years, some plastic surgeons have started posting videos of their surgeries on social media in hopes of informing and attracting new patients. But in some cases, their antics seem designed more for entertainment than education, raising ethical questions, according to a new paper from Northwestern Medicine researchers published in the journal Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.

Chicago Tribune 0

In recent years, some plastic surgeons have started posting videos of their surgeries on social media in hopes of informing and attracting new patients. But in some cases, their antics seem designed more for entertainment than education, raising ethical questions, according to a new paper from Northwestern Medicine researchers published in the journal Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.

Newsweek 0

A. Vania Apkarian, a pain researcher at Northwestern University who also uses brain imaging techniques, but was not involved in the research, says that the study advances our understanding about how our biases influence our healthcare. “We have assumed for many years that the brain would control pain perception at many different levels and that expectations would change those things,” he tells Newsweek. This study is the first to show the entire circuitry linking expectations and perceptions, Apkarian explained.

Reuters 0

“Plastic surgery is uniquely drawn to social media because we tend to do more marketing and we are a visual specialty,” said Dr. Clark Schierle , senior author of the guidelines and a plastic surgeon at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago. “In general, there should be an effort to avoid distractions from the actual surgery itself and sharing any content that makes the patient identifiable without specific consent,” Schierle said by email.

U.S. News & World Report 0

“In those cases, there are more studies that are just done on females, because they’re female-prevalent diseases,” says Teresa Woodruff , director of the Women’s Health Research Institute at Northwestern University in Chicago. “But if you include males in the biology [studies], you often learn more about why there is this impact. That’s why we’re advocating for inclusion at the basic science level.” Transparent, inclusive studies that publish the gender breakdown of participants and provide results stratified by sex would make new scientific discoveries more likely, she says.

NPR 0

“Every single day, I get questions about what moisturizer should I use, what sunscreen should I use,” says Dr. Steve Xu, a dermatologist at Northwestern’s Feinberg School of Medicine. “I found myself really struggling to provide evidence-based recommendations for my patients,” he says. So he decided to take on the challenge of figuring out “what’s actually in this stuff.” Xu and some of his colleagues at Northwestern, examined the ingredients of the top 100 best-selling moisturizers sold by Amazon, Target and Walmart. And what he found was pretty surprising, he says. Nearly half — 45 percent — of the products in the study that claimed to be “fragrance-free” actually contained some form of fragrance. And the vast majority — 83 percent — of products labeled “hypoallergenic” contained a potentially allergenic chemical.

Northwestern University’s medical school has launched a website featuring animated characters Olivia the Ovary and Timothy the Testis to teach reproductive health to children. The site, called Reprotopia, features the dancing duo in animated videos that explain reproduction, aimed at children ages 10 to 14.

“Timothy and Olivia are a neat way for kids to de-sensationalize the words ovary and testis,” Dr. Teresa Woodruff, director of the Oncofertility Consortium at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, who helped create the series, stated in Monday’s release. “If we can do that for these common terms, it will be easier for kids to access the information they need for their health as they get older. This removes the taboos to talk about it by giving the kids the terms early enough, so it doesn’t sound ‘dirty.'”

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