Media Coverage

The work done by Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine faculty members (and even some students) is regularly highlighted in newspapers, online media outlets and more. Below you’ll find links to articles and videos of Feinberg in the news.

NBC News 0

Cases of aggressive prostate cancer appear to be on the rise, researchers reported Tuesday. The good news is it’s still rare for prostate cancer to spread. Just 3 percent of cases have already started spreading when men are diagnosed and prostate cancer overall has not become more common, the team found. “One hypothesis is the disease has become more aggressive, regardless of the change in screening,” said Dr. Edward Schaeffer, chair of urology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and Northwestern Medicine, who led the study.

NBC News 0

An American doctor treating the horrific injuries suffered by Syrian civilians has warned that the closure of a vital highway has put 300,000 people at risk of death and starvation. Dr. Samer Attar, a Chicago-based orthopedic surgeon who volunteered to help local medics in the embattled city of Aleppo, said last weekend’s severing of the Castello Road has already caused shortages of food and medicine. Attar, an assistant professor at Northwestern University’s School of Medicine, was working in an underground hospital run by local doctors but supported by the Syrian American Medical Society (SAMS). “On a daily basis, sometimes twice daily, I witnessed civilians horrifically and brutally injured from rockets, barrel bombs, and cluster bombs,” Attar said. “Homes, schools, and markets were hit. You would hear about dozens killed, scores more injured. It’s devastating and overwhelming to witness.”

Today 0

“A leg cramp is really just a muscle contracting and tightening spontaneously,” said emergency medicine specialist Dr. Scott Dresden of Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago. “The problem is that can be very painful for several seconds or even several minutes.”

NBC News 0

”A leg cramp is really just a muscle contracting and tightening spontaneously,” said emergency medicine specialist Dr. Scott Dresden of Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago. “The problem is that can be very painful for several seconds or even several minutes.”…It’s a serious condition that can lead to a life-threatening pulmonary embolism, according to Dr. Dresden, assistant professor in emergency medicine Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. “It’s smarter to get in to see someone right away if you have symptoms of a DVT or are just concerned,” he elaborated.

Bloomberg 0

Employees who are around more light (especially natural light) during the day are more likely to be healthier and maintain a good mood, according to a 2014 study published in the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine. Two surprising findings: Test participants with windows in their offices got a startling 46 minutes more sleep per night than their natural light-starved counterparts and even reported getting more exercise after work. “Light also can affect the metabolism and efficiency of how your body utilizes food, which can be important for weight,” said Phyllis Zee, MD, Ph.D., director of the Sleep Disorders Center at Northwestern Memorial Hospital, and one of the study’s authors. Not blessed with a window to the outside world? Zee suggests increasing the intensity of overhead light, getting a desktop light box such as those used for Seasonal Affective Disorder, taking an occasional walk to a window, or simply stepping outside.

The New York Times 0

Dr. Marilyn Cornelis, an assistant professor at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, said her research had identified many genes involved in caffeine metabolism, and that relying on only one or two genetic factors could provide people with a false sense of reassurance. “There are clearly other genetic and environmental factors contributing to differences in caffeine metabolism,” she said. “And these are not captured by existing tests.”

HealthDay 0

“We found moderate to vigorous physical activity actually benefits women psychologically and that, in turn, helps their memory,” said the study’s lead author, Siobhan Phillips. She is assistant professor of preventive medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.

Chicago Tribune 0

Breast cancer survivors who exercised more were less likely to report memory problems in a new study by researchers at Northwestern University and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The study looked at moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, such as brisk walking, biking and jogging, and complaints of memory problems, which are common among breast cancer survivors. “Exercise may provide a way to cope with some of the stress experienced during and following a cancer diagnosis and may help women to feel more confident that they can cope with the cancer experience,” said lead author Siobhan Phillips, an assistant professor of preventive medicine at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, via email.

HealthDay 0

“The results were surprising in some ways,” said study author Dr. Steve Xu, a resident in the department of dermatology at the McGaw Medical Center of Northwestern University, in Chicago.

“But, there are some important caveats,” he added. “The definition of a ‘sunscreen’ has broadened a lot. Sunscreens are no longer just bright blue bottles thrown in beach bags,” he noted, with less-protective moisturizers now often substituting for more sunscreen-specific products.

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