Media Coverage

The work done by Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine faculty members (and even some students) is regularly highlighted in newspapers, online media outlets and more. Below you’ll find links to articles and videos of Feinberg in the news.

CNN 0

Framing mass shootings as a “mental health issue” certainly could lead to policies aimed at improving mental health, but “that won’t prevent the next shooter,” said Lori Ann Post, a professor of emergency medicine and medical social sciences at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine, who studies violence and policy. It’s estimated that less than 5% of shootings are committed by people with a diagnosable mental illness, Post said.

WTTW 0

“It is important to advocate for labeling sesame in packaged food,” said lead study author Dr. Ruchi Gupta, an attending physician at Lurie Children’s Hospital who specializes in asthma, food allergies and eczema, in a statement. “Sesame is in a lot of foods as hidden ingredients. It is very hard to avoid.” Unlike milk and peanut allergies, which often develop early in life and are outgrown by adolescence, sesame allergies affect children and adults to a similar degree. Researchers also found 4 in 5 patients with a sesame allergy had at least one other food allergy.

The New York Times 0

“Sesame allergy is becoming a common allergy in the U.S.,” said Dr. Ruchi S. Gupta, a professor of pediatrics at Northwestern Medicine in Chicago and senior author of the study, which was published in the journal JAMA Network Open. “The impact on over a million people in the U.S. is significant.” The study relied on online and phone survey responses from 40,453 adults and 38,408 children. People who have had at least one symptom of sesame allergy made up an estimated 0.23 percent of the population, Dr. Gupta and her colleagues found.

National Public Radio 0

Luckily, a team of researchers led by Dr. Ruchi Gupta, director of the Science and Outcomes of Allergy and Asthma Research Team at Northwestern Medicine Northwestern Medicine and a physician at Lurie Children’s Hospital, already had data on hand — information from a national survey of food allergies they conducted between Oct. 1, 2015, and Sept. 31, 2016. For this study, researchers distributed surveys on food allergy diagnoses and symptoms to nearly 80,000 different people in over 50,000 households. To meet Gottlieb’s request, all they had to do was pull out their sesame data and give it a look.

The New York Times 0

“Sesame allergy is becoming a common allergy in the U.S.,” said Dr. Ruchi S. Gupta, a professor of pediatrics at Northwestern Medicine in Chicago and senior author of the study, which was published in the journal JAMA Network Open. “The impact on over a million people in the U.S. is significant.” The study relied on online and phone survey responses from 40,453 adults and 38,408 children. People who have had at least one symptom of sesame allergy made up an estimated 0.23 percent of the population, Dr. Gupta and her colleagues found.

Chicago Tribune 0

Helping travelers start adjusting to a new time zone in-flight makes sense , sleep experts said. The catch is that passengers aren’t necessarily starting on the same schedule – some might be starting their journey, while others are on a connecting flight mid-trip, said Phyllis Zee, an expert in sleep and circadian rhythm disorders at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine. “What would be really cool would be to individualize it based on the person’s itinerary,” Zee said. That’s tough on a plane, where it’s hard to escape a seatmate’s overhead light and there’s no such thing as a personal thermostat.

Crain's Chicago Business 0

SCIENTIST USING ARGONNE X-RAY TO SEE INTO SHARK SPINES: What’s Northwestern Medicine scientist Stuart Stock doing with shark spines and the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory? He’s looking deep into the strong, flexible and long-lasting vertebrae of sharks to see what it can tell us about our own, more fragile spinal system, according to a Northwestern Now article. Stock, a research professor of cell and developmental biology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, says he first became interested in the shark vertebrae three years ago after learning about a colleague’s experiment with the fish.

The New York Times 0

“This perhaps points at the need to look into other data sources that may paint a more complete picture of the patient’s clinical reality,” said Dr. L. Nelson Sanchez-Pinto, a researcher at Northwestern University who was not involved in the DeepMind paper but is exploring similar technology. Because the system learns from the medical history of mostly male patients admitted to V.A. hospitals, it is also unclear how well the technology would work when used with patients outside that particular population.

CNN 0

“This is an extraordinary time” in the treatment of sickle cell disease, said Dr. Alexis Thompson, hematology section head at the Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago, who is not involved in the trial. “It’s terribly exciting that there is so much attention on cutting-edge science and a condition that has lagged far behind many other medically important diseases.” The study aims to recruit up to 45 adults with severe sickle cell disease. Thompson said that many in the scientific community have been looking forward to the trial since it was posted in late 2018, though only Monday was a patient publicly identified in an interview with NPR.

Chicago Tribune 0

Northwestern Memorial Hospital is on a winning streak with U.S. News & World Report, which has again ranked the Chicago hospital as the best in Illinois and, this year, as one of the top 10 in the country. Northwestern was the only Illinois hospital to earn a spot on the publication’s national top 20 list. It is the eighth consecutive year Northwestern has taken the No. 1 spot in Illinois. In the state ranking, University of Chicago Medical Center ranked second and NorthShore University HealthSystem and Rush University Medical Center tied for third.

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