Media Coverage

The work done by Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine faculty members (and even some students) is regularly highlighted in newspapers, online media outlets and more. Below you’ll find links to articles and videos of Feinberg in the news.

U.S. News & World Report 0

“It’s an interesting intervention but there’s limited and conflicting data,” says Dr. Tanya Simuni, director of the Parkinson’s and Movement Disorders Center at Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago. “I’m cautiously interested in WBV – and there’s a tremendous need for alternative therapies for people with Parkinson’s disease – but more [research] needs to be done.”

FOX News (National) 0

Researchers in Illinois have unveiled the third gene linked with Parkinson’s, a discovery that comes following the death of legendary boxer Muhammad Ali, who suffered from the neurodegenerative disease for three decades. Scientists’ findings, published Monday in Nature Genetics, suggest the genetic mutation TMEM230 was present among Parkinson’s patients in North America and Asia, and had similar protein trafficking characteristics as the other two genetic mutations linked with Parkinson’s, according to a Northwestern University press release. They found TMEM230 produced a protein involved in the packaging of dopamine in neurons, which is significant because Parkinson’s is marked by the breakdown of dopamine-producing neurons.

CBS News 0

Not getting a good night’s sleep can result in a number of problems including poor concentration, weight gain, and a greater likelihood of accidents. For shift workers and individuals who experience chronic sleep deprivation, new research suggests insufficient sleep could also increase the risk of heart disease. In humans, as in all mammals, almost all physiological and behavioral processes, in particular the sleep-wake cycle, follow a circadian rhythm that is regulated by an internal clock located in the brain,” said Daniela Grimaldi, M.D., Ph.D., lead author and a research assistant professor at Northwestern University, said in a press release. “When our sleep-wake and feeding cycles are not in tune with the rhythms dictated by our internal clock, circadian misalignment occurs.”

Fox News (National) 0

Not getting a good night’s sleep can result in a number of problems including poor concentration, weight gain, and a greater likelihood of accidents. For shift workers and individuals who experience chronic sleep deprivation, new research suggests insufficient sleep could also increase the risk of heart disease. In humans, as in all mammals, almost all physiological and behavioral processes, in particular the sleep-wake cycle, follow a circadian rhythm that is regulated by an internal clock located in the brain,” said Daniela Grimaldi, M.D., Ph.D., lead author and a research assistant professor at Northwestern University, said in a press release. “When our sleep-wake and feeding cycles are not in tune with the rhythms dictated by our internal clock, circadian misalignment occurs.”

Web MD 0

Sleep deprivation and an abnormal sleep cycle may increase the risk of heart disease, especially for shift workers, a small study suggests. “In humans, as in all mammals, almost all physiological and behavioral processes, in particular the sleep-wake cycle, follow a circadian rhythm that is regulated by an internal clock located in the brain,” said study lead author Dr. Daniela Grimaldi. “When our sleep-wake and feeding cycles are not in tune with the rhythms dictated by our internal clock, circadian misalignment occurs,” added Grimaldi, a research assistant professor at Northwestern University in Chicago.

Health Day 0

Sleep deprivation and an abnormal sleep cycle may increase the risk of heart disease, especially for shift workers, a small study suggests. “In humans, as in all mammals, almost all physiological and behavioral processes, in particular the sleep-wake cycle, follow a circadian rhythm that is regulated by an internal clock located in the brain,” said study lead author Dr. Daniela Grimaldi. “When our sleep-wake and feeding cycles are not in tune with the rhythms dictated by our internal clock, circadian misalignment occurs,” added Grimaldi, a research assistant professor at Northwestern University in Chicago.

The Huffington Post 0

National Cancer Survivors Day was June 5, 2016. As the Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center prepared for our annual Survivors’ Celebration Walk and 5K, I reflected on the experiences of the patients I treat there. As a clinical psychologist, I am privileged to hear their innermost thoughts and feelings about what it means to survive cancer — some of which they have not shared with their other doctors, friends or family.

ABC News 0

Low-income families with children with allergies spend more than twice as much on visits to emergency rooms and hospitals than mid- to high-income families, recent research from Northwestern University found. And about 40 percent of those children surveyed also reported experiencing life-threatening reactions to food, such as trouble breathing and a drop in blood pressure. “The fact that they were able to open up a food pantry for kids who can’t afford the special foods for food allergies — incredible,” said Dr. Ruchi Gupta, an associate professor of pediatrics who led the Northwestern study, which was published in April.

The Washington Post 0

Low-income families with children with allergies spend more than twice as much on visits to emergency rooms and hospitals than mid- to high-income families, recent research from Northwestern University found. And about 40 percent of those children surveyed also reported experiencing life-threatening reactions to food, such as trouble breathing and a drop in blood pressure. “The fact that they were able to open up a food pantry for kids who can’t afford the special foods for food allergies — incredible,” said Dr. Ruchi Gupta, an associate professor of pediatrics who led the Northwestern study, which was published in April.

Chicago Tribune 0

Low-income families with children with allergies spend more than twice as much on visits to emergency rooms and hospitals than mid- to high-income families, recent research from Northwestern University found. And about 40 percent of those children surveyed also reported experiencing life-threatening reactions to food, such as trouble breathing and a drop in blood pressure. “The fact that they were able to open up a food pantry for kids who can’t afford the special foods for food allergies — incredible,” said Dr. Ruchi Gupta, an associate professor of pediatrics who led the Northwestern study, which was published in April.

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