Media Coverage

The work done by Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine faculty members (and even some students) is regularly highlighted in newspapers, online media outlets and more. Below you’ll find links to articles and videos of Feinberg in the news.

Gather.com  0

According to scientist at Northwestern University, “Our
main finding was that people with a high frequency of religious
participation in young adulthood were 50 percent more likely to become obese
by middle age than those with no religious participation in young
adulthood. 

ScienceMagNews.com 0

“While they are certainly bothersome, hot flashes may not be all bad,” said
Northwestern Medicine endocrinologist Emily Szmuilowicz,
MD, who is lead author of the study. “Our research found that
despite previous reports suggesting that menopause symptoms were associated
with increased levels of risk markers for heart disease, such as blood
pressure and cholesterol, the actual outcomes tell a different
story.”

American Medical News (AMEDNews.com) 0

Seniors Emma Daisy, 31, and Rebecca Cantone, 25, are pursuing careers in
family medicine. Both women want to treat urban poor and medically
underserved populations after they graduate from Northwestern
University Feinberg School of Medicine in May.

Yahoo News! 0

Northwestern Memorial is mentioned for being ranked number
one in the Chicago area on the new U.S. News & World Report “Best
Hospitals” Metro ranking.  

Associated Press (ReporterNews.com) 0

Using plastic models of breasts embedded with data-capturing sensors and
simulated tumors, Dr. Carla Pugh of Northwestern University
Feinberg School of Medicine is zeroing in on how to measure a medical
student’s ability to tell the difference between a cancerous lump and a
benign cyst.

Daily Mail (UK) 0

The study into obesity and churtchgoing was led by Matthew Feinstein, a
fourth-year student at Northwestern University Feinberg School of
Medicine.

CBSChicago.com 0

If you’re young and religious, are you more prone to obesity by middle age? A
new study by Northwestern University says yes. The study
says those who attend regular religious activities are 50 percent more
likely to become obese by middle age as those who have no religious
involvement, according to a news release.

SunTimes.com 0

“We don’t know why frequent religious participation is associated with
development of obesity, but the upshot of these findings highlight a group
that could benefit from targeted efforts at obesity prevention,” said
Matthew Feinstein, the study’s lead investigator and a fourth-year student
at Northwestern University Feinberg School of
Medicine.

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