Media Coverage

The work done by Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine faculty members (and even some students) is regularly highlighted in newspapers, online media outlets and more. Below you’ll find links to articles and videos of Feinberg in the news.

U.S. News & World Report 0

Steady daytime levels of the stress hormone cortisol are associated with serious health problems, such as inflammation, obesity and cancer, researchers say. Normally, cortisol levels should vary throughout the day. “Cortisol is naturally high in the morning to help perk you up, and it decreases into the evening,” said study lead author Emma Adam . She is a professor of human development and social policy at Northwestern University.

HealthDay 0

Steady daytime levels of the stress hormone cortisol are associated with serious health problems, such as inflammation, obesity and cancer, researchers say. Normally, cortisol levels should vary throughout the day. “Cortisol is naturally high in the morning to help perk you up, and it decreases into the evening,” said study lead author Emma Adam . She is a professor of human development and social policy at Northwestern University.

TIME Magazine 0

In August, the Home Centered Care Institute announced that it is launching an education program to train 5,000 new doctors how to care for elderly people in their homes. Training programs include prominent hospitals like the Cleveland Clinic and Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine.

The New York Times 0

I teach my students to depict the specifics of every inch of the fetal bodies, until the drawings become profound examinations of bodies stopped in time. Their final assignment is to research a contemporary person with the same condition as their chosen fetus and do a presentation on his or her life. It helps these future doctors to stop seeing the specimens as historic artifacts or tragic medical problems. It’s as if we’re back at the Mutter, but this time those fetuses are given possible present lives, going forward in time.

CNBC 0

“It has been extremely challenging, and many clinical trials have failed,” said Dr. Dimitri Krainc chairman of the department of neurology and director of the Center for Rare Neurological Diseases at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. “However, we have learned important lessons from these failures.” The bigger problem, though, is that levodopa and other approved agents aren’t neuroprotective, said Krainc, “meaning that they do not prevent neurons from degenerating.” Recent advancements in genetics provide some hope for better drug targets — including, according to Krainc, for the kind of Parkinson’s that Silverstein has, driven by a mutation in GBA. Krainc is a co-founder of Lysosomal Therapeutics and chairs its scientific advisory board.

Huffington Post 0

Northwestern Medicine scientists have found for the first time, that breathing rhythm induces electrical activity that enhances both memory recall and emotional judgements. “One of the major findings in this study is that there is a dramatic difference in brain activity in the amygdala and hippocampus during inhalation compared with exhalation,” said lead author Christina Zelano , assistant professor of neurology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. “When you breathe in, we discovered you are stimulating neurons in the olfactory cortex, amygdala and hippocampus, all across the limbic system.”

The New York Times 0

Dr. Califf’s editorial accompanied a rather startling report in the journal by Dr. Shuai Xu, a dermatologist, and two colleagues at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. On the heels of the thousands of complaints uncovered about WEN products, the F.D.A. made publicly available its Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition’s Adverse Event Reporting System, a repository of adverse events related to foods, dietary supplements and cosmetics. This enabled Dr. Xu and colleagues to analyze all the adverse events associated with cosmetics and personal care products voluntarily submitted from 2004 through 2016 by consumers and health care professionals. Through 2014, they averaged 396 a year. There was a 78 percent increase in reports in 2015 and a 300 percent rise in 2016, largely driven by complaints about WEN products.

The Washington Post 0

“It seems every two or three years we have another controversy in women’s health,” says Steve Xu, a health-­policy researcher and Northwestern University dermatology resident who co-wrote a paper that found “significant weaknesses” in FDA approval of high-risk gynecological devices. “We have pelvic mesh, we have concerns with morcellators” — devices used during hysterectomies that can spread undiagnosed cancer. “And then with Essure, it’s like, here we go again.”

Crain's Chicago Business 0

“Ultimately, being in your own home is where most seniors want to be. With home-based primary care, it allows physicians to meet that need,” said Dr. Lee Lindquist , chief of geriatrics at Feinberg, who leads the initiative. “With HCCI we’re able to leverage the educational abilities of Northwestern and lead the field in training the new generation of physicians in home-based medical care.”

The New York Times 0

Dr. Ruchi Gupta a food allergy researcher at the Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago and Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, who led the national study, noted that at allergy meetings around the world, “you’d hear more and more about adult-onset food allergy. But this was all anecdotal. That’s the reason we did the study, to get the numbers behind how frequently.” Last year, Dr. Gupta and colleagues from Northwestern and the NORC Survey Research Lab at the University of Chicago surveyed 40,447 adults across the United States, recruited from a nationally representative sample. They found that shellfish was the most common food allergy among adults, affecting 3.9 percent of the population, followed by peanut allergies, at 2.4 percent, and tree nut allergies, at 1.9 percent.

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