Media Coverage

The work done by Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine faculty members (and even some students) is regularly highlighted in newspapers, online media outlets and more. Below you’ll find links to articles and videos of Feinberg in the news.

HealthDay 0

Online reviews of surgeons who perform cosmetic plastic surgery may be unreliable, researchers say. The researchers examined 1,077 online reviews about breast augmentation surgeons that were posted by people in six large U.S. cities. There were 935 positive and 142 negative reviews. “We found the people who write these reviews are either very happy or unhappy, so it’s difficult for the consumer to get balanced information,” said senior study author Dr. John Kim, a professor of plastic surgery at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.

U.S. News & World Report 0

The researchers examined 1,077 online reviews about breast augmentation surgeons that were posted by people in six large U.S. cities. There were 935 positive and 142 negative reviews. “We found the people who write these reviews are either very happy or unhappy, so it’s difficult for the consumer to get balanced information,” said senior study author Dr. John Kim, a professor of plastic surgery at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.

CNN 0

Genetic testing appears to be an evolution in the “when the product is surprisingly cheap, you are the product” ethos: You are very much the product of commercial genetic testing companies while footing the bill, as reported by the authors of a 2014 article in The New England Journal of Medicine. “23andMe has … suggested that its longer-range goal is to collect a massive biobank of genetic information that can be used and sold for medical research and could also lead to patentable discoveries,” wrote George J. Annas, a legal scholar at Boston University School of Public Health, and Dr. Sherman Elias of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University.

The New York Times 0

Centers in Somerset, N.J., and Oklahoma City run by privately held ProCure have defaulted on their debts, according to the investment firm Loop Capital. A center associated with Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, a hospital consortium, in Washington State lost $19 million in the 2015 fiscal year before restructuring its debt, documents show. A center near Chicago lost tens of millions of dollars before its own restructuring as part of a 2013 sale to hospitals now affiliated with Northwestern Medicine, according to regulatory documents.

The New York Times 0

I provide therapy to people from all socio-economic and racial backgrounds. I am the only black female clinical psychologist on the faculty of the department of psychiatry at Northwestern University, and black women often come to me in secret, feeling alone and embarrassed. They come despite friends and family telling them to “just pray.” They come because they are “desperate” and “can’t take it anymore.” I often get requests for informal consultation via email, LinkedIn, even Facebook. They’re skeptical about mental health treatment. They don’t want therapy, just to talk, and maybe get some advice.

The New York Times 0

At Northwestern University, Dr. Ryan P. Merkow said he had only one pump but many patients who needed it. “Now I have to decide who gets this potentially lifesaving therapy,” he said. One patient is about to become a father, and Dr. Merkow said, “I desperately want to help him.”

The devices, called Codman pumps, are made by Cerenovus, a subsidiary of Johnson & Johnson, which told doctors in a letter dated April 4 that it had decided to stop production effective April 1 “because of significant and multiple raw material supply constraints within the manufacturing process.”

Crain's Chicago Business 0

Thirty-seven Illinois hospitals got the highest grade for patient safety in the latest Leapfrog Group assessment. Among them was Northwestern Memorial Hospital, which jumped back to an A ranking after three years of B and C. “Northwestern improved on several (patient safety indicators) and infection measures and made improvements on the patient experience measures related to communication by doctors and nurses, as well as staff responsiveness,” Erica Mobley, director of operations at Leapfrog Group, said in an email.

Chicago Tribune 0

Nine Illinois hospitals received A’s for the last five years in a row: University of Chicago Medical Center in Chicago, West Suburban Medical Center in Oak Park, Rush University Medical Center in Chicago, Rush Copley Medical Center in Aurora, OSF St. Joseph Medical Center in Bloomington, OSF St. Mary Medical Center in Galesburg, Northwestern Medicine Central DuPage Hospital in Winfield, Elmhurst Hospital and Amita Health St. Alexius Medical Center in Hoffman Estates.

USA Today 0

Experts said aneurysms appear most often in people over the age of 50. Babak Jahromi, a neurosurgeon and professor at Northwestern University’s medical school, wrote in an email that having a ruptured aneurysm at 31 like Farquhar is “less common” but “not rare.” Jahromi, McGail and Riina said that it’s possible, but not certain, that Farquhar’s pitching activity could have raised his blood pressure and contributed to the rupture. “It’s not so surprising that it’s while participating in a game,” Riina said. “But other times, people have aneurysms when they’re just walking down the street or sitting at home.”

CBS News 0

White Sox medical personnel clustered around him and then carried him to the clubhouse, and a waiting ambulance brought him to a hospital, where he is now in what a team official calls the fight of his life. Farquhar had suffered a cerebral hemorrhage brought on by a ruptured aneurysm. We asked Dr. Babak Jahromi, a professor of neurosurgery at Northwestern Memorial Hospital if there are any warning signs. “There generally isn’t until the aneurysm leaks and at that point patients experience a sudden severe headache,” Dr. Jahromi said. But how could a 31-year old professional athlete go from peak performer to hospital patient in the time it takes his 93 mile an hour fastball to reach home plate?

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